A loan of $8,000 helped to fund a commercial kitchen that would enable my business to expand into a new market.


Ines's story

Living in Massachusetts I was very active in the community and used to bring empanadas to meetings and events what make friend call it empanadas revolucionarias. They were greatly appreciated and people started asking to buy empanadas. I went to an important central Massachusetts art fair where the empanadas were a big success. My children and grand children lived in Oregon and pushed me to move and start a food cart in Portland to be close to them what I did in 2013.

The first year it was a failure I didn't loss any money but I didn't profit any money. I was lucky enough to get accepted at Portland Saturday Market where I started getting enough income to survive. It was hard to start a business in a city that I didn't know, find out rules and where to buy and where to sell. I did a lot of mistakes. I went to wrong places for help, i got wrong advices, but I learn from that and found my niche in whole sale to supermarkets, keeping street and farmer markets and the great window of artisan Saturday Market. I am focusing now on bringing the commercial kitchen to life.

I have prove to myself that my empanadas are a good product that my customers are delighted to eat and people from other states even come recommended for friends to try my "revolucionarias empanadas". I don't have business as customers yet due to rules that forbid to sell from a food cart. I know that I can sell to restaurants also if I have a commercial kitchen. I work with my husband and my son who is my only one employee by now.


This loan is special because:

It helps two entrepreneurs to grow their food business by securing a commercial kitchen kit.



Loan details


About PDX Empanadas

Industry: Food
Years in operation: 3 years - 5 years
Website: pdxempanadas.com

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Loan details