A loan of $3,100 helped a member to purchase creams, massage lotion, and slimming and toning plaster.

Futuro Para Todos Group's story

The name of this communal bank is Futuro Para Todos. It comprises eighteen entrepreneurs who work in different businesses, such as selling new and used clothing, a restaurant, a bakery, selling firewood, shoemaking, and other services. They all belong to the city of Angol.

Ruth is group delegate for the communal bank. In the picture, she is the second person from the left, sitting in the front row and wearing a plad coat in brown tones and a white scarf. She is carrying a black purse, has dark brown hair, and is wearing it down.

She has been in the esthetics business for six months. She says she works from home and other times she goes to her customers' homes. She works by the hour and organizes her schedule according to her availability, since she has small children. She buys her merchandise from a distributor specializing in beauty supplies. She will use the loan to buy creams, massage lotion, and slimming and toning plaster. One of Ruth's business goals is to have the opportunity of opening a beauty salon where she could serve her customers.

Ruth lives with her father, her sister, and her two children. One is twelve years old and the other is six months old. Her dream, on a business as well as a family level, is to grow as a person and provide means for her family, and to have her own home so that she can live with her family, who are her children.

She is very happy and grateful for the opportunity offered by Fondo Esperanza, because it will allow her to invest in her business. She says the trainings have been vital for her business and also for her personal development, because she has learned how to better organize and distribute her income and investments. Regarding her communal bank, she is very comfortable being a part of it because there is respect and unity.

Angol is located 80 miles northeast of Temuco, which is the capital of the ninth region, and 378 miles south of Santiago, Chile's capital. The name means "upward crawl" in mapudungun, which is the language of the mapuche people. Its residents work hard in agriculture and forestry, which are sectors that have currently gained relevance, particularly regarding the production of fruits and vegetables.

In this group: Ruth, Tatiana, Marjorie, Pamela, Monica, Monica, Audolia, Manuel, Yanett, Victor, Sergio, Rolando, Javier, Olga, Carmen, Joseline, Mariela

Translated from Spanish by Kiva volunteer Mariana Sanchis

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