A loan of $2,275 helped a member to buy plastic items: bags, dishes, spoons, etc.


Flores Magon Group's story

This development unit is called “FLORES MAGON” [Cipriano Ricardo Flores Magón (September 16, 1874 — November 21, 1922) was a noted Mexican anarchist and social reform activist]. They tell us that they named it thus because most of the members live in a place called Flores Magón. The group is located in the town of Zitácuaro in the state of Michoacán. It has 11 members.

The group representative is María Socorro S. Díaz. Doña Soco, as her family and acquaintances call her, is 43 years old. She studied to be an Executive Secretary but says that she never practiced her profession because she married very young and her husband didn’t let her work so that she could dedicate herself totally to home and children.

Doña Soco is a very hard working woman. Her husband realized in time that what he earned wasn’t sufficient to support the family so she decided to help him with household expenses and started her plastics business. Now, both of them sell plastic bags, drinking glasses, Styrofoam dishes, spoons, forks, etc. She tells us that her customers are people who have stands in the market, tortilla makers and bakers. She has been in this business for 7 years and has her plastics stand outside the Zitácuaro, Michoacán market where she also sells women’s underwear and crafts like bathroom sets, napkins, decorated purses, etc.

Socorro has been married to Mario for 22 years and they have three daughters: Marisol, 22, Stephanie, 19, both married, and Carol, 17 who is studying to be a teacher at the Zitácuaro Normal School. Socorro hopes that her youngest daughter finishes her career because she says that’s the best inheritance a parent can leave her children.

Roció Sanromán M., 29, is also part of the “Flores Magón” group. She is currently finishing high school in the Open High School program because her parents couldn’t afford to buy her uniforms and school supplies back when she was in regular school. She says her husband is a great help to her because he encourages her to continue forward and study a career. Doña Rosi, as her friends and family refer to her, sells candies, juices, chicharrones (made from soy), soft-drinks, snacks, popsicles, etc. in front of the Zitácuaro Regional Hospital.

She has had the business for two years. She comments that she started selling juices and other items because she noticed that family members of patients in the hospital didn’t have anything to eat at lunch so she decided to set up her stand. Another motive behind her doing this is that she wanted to help her husband meet household expenses.

Rosi is married to Salvador, who is an attorney, and they have a six year old daughter named Leylan who is in first grade.

Rosi says that her life goal is to have a stable location where she can sell her candy and also sell costume jewelry because she likes to design jeweled necklaces and bracelets. Another one of her goals is to finish high school and then complete a career in Law.

She says that profits from the candy and juice sales will be to buy the lot to build the locale she so dreams of.

The other nine group members are: María Guadalupe Julián C., Reyna P. E., Isabel M. García, Clementina Solís S., Stephanie Sanromán S., Teresa López P., Perla Janeth M. López Azucena Julián C. and María Amparo S. N.. They want the loans to invest in several lines of work: catalogue bedspread sales, candy sales, catalogue shoe sales, arts and crafts, bakery, catalogue cosmetics sales, etc.

In this group: Maria Guadalupe, Maria Socorro, Rocio, Reyna , Isabel , Clementina, Stephanie, Teresa, Perla Janeth, Asucena , Maria Amparo

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Translated from Spanish by Kiva volunteer Polliz


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