A loan of $4,750 helped a member buy baby chickens, guinea pigs, and food to enlarge her animal farm.


Josecito De Cumbe( Cuenca) Group's story

The Josecito de Cumbe Communal Bank is comprised of tenacious, happy, and charismatic women. Day to day they look for the way to get ahead with their families.

They live in the parish with the same name as their communal bank. It is located to the south of the Cuenca canton. Cumbe has an area of 71.4 square kilometers and represents 2.3 percent of the territory of the canton. It is 24 kilometers from the city of Cuenca, and it is connected by the asphalt road, Cuenca-Loja.

Among its activities, farming stands out. Older people and women farm, and the rest of the population goes to Cuenca everyday to do different economic activities like working in factories, making handicrafts, or being employees in commerce. Some provide services, primarily as construction workers.

Teresa G. is 41 years old. She lives in the Cumbe parish with her husband, a construction worker, and their six children. The children’s ages range from 20 to 3 years old. Her first three children are in high school. The other two are in elementary school in the area. The youngest is with her all the time. The house where they live is lent to them by a brother. This is until they are able to have their own home, which will give the entire family tranquility.

Teresa raises guinea pigs and chickens, and they grow rapidly. They are for sale as much as for household consumption. She has had two cycles. With her new loan she will buy more chickens, guinea pigs, and food for them.

María Sarbelia C., age 51, is a very happy and charismatic member of the group. This is her second loan. She will buy baby chickens and food to enlarge her animal farm. She has been doing this for a long time. She also has a dairy cow, and she sells her production in her community.

She lives in the Cumbe parish with her husband and four of their five children. The third daughter got married and lives independently. Two of her children work and help economically with the household expenses. They also help with the educational expenses of her last daughter, who goes to the local school. Her second daughter does not work, but she helps with the household chores.

Her goal is to have more animals in her farmyard.

In this group: Zoila Rosa, Maria Isabel, Lourdes Mariela, Sandra Beronica, Rosa Francisca, Zoila Maria, Maria Sarbelia, Dolores Azuncion, Teresa De Jesus, Rosa Elvira, Blanca Elsa, Diana Lisandra, Blanca Leonor, Cecilia Del Carmen, Ana Cesilia, Libia Marisol, Magali Tania
*not pictured

Translated from Spanish by Kiva volunteer Ginny Kalish


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