A loan of $3,725 helped a member to purchase crops such as coffee that she has not sold before and also some wholesale stock.


Bakyala Kwekulakulana Group 2, Lugazi's story

At the start of N. Sauda’s produce and wholesale business in 2003, somebody laid a bet that her business would not see the light of day after a month’s course. The skepticism was a no-brainer to her, as she had set out her objectives to succeed by then. She had to bring her guts and determination to bear in the face of such low expectations from some of her disparaging friends.

With huge reserves of optimism and with a desire to prove her detractors wrong, 35-year-old Sauda embarked on her mission – to get established in the business genre of her preference, to wit: a produce sales and small commodity wholesale business. She went out of her depth to fight off the early financial quagmires that had reared their heads and were making her chances of success hang in the balance.

Sauda started getting into her stride when she began selling rice, groundnuts (peanuts), beans and millet. When her prospects began improving, her down-the-line attitude got even better. As a consequence, all her three children, who were hitherto not going to school, began attending school.

Sauda’s customers are mostly small retailers. In a month, she says she earns to the tune of 600,000 shillings. She is also a counselor within her locality. With this loan she wants to buy some produce she has not sold before like coffee and cotton. She also wants to buy more matches, textbooks and tea leaves for her wholesale stock.

In this group: Sauda, Jane, Joyce, Eva, Salongo, Salongo, Ruth, Yona, Abudu, Doreen, Juliet, Immaculate*, Harriet
*not pictured


Loan details


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Loan details