Kiva Help

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  1. Click here to learn how to create a CSV file.
  2. Click here to learn how to create a CSV file.
  3. 0 Delinquency Par Rate
  4. 1) To Push The Frontier Of Access To Financial Services
  5. 2a) To Create Or Expand Offerings To Interesting Client Segments
  6. 2b) To Create Or Expand Interesting Product Offerings
  7. 2c) To Create Or Expand Interesting Wraparound Services
  8. 3a) To Reward Offerings To Interesting Client Segments
  9. 3b) To Reward Interesting Product Offerings
  10. 3c) To Reward Interesting Wraparound Services
  11. 4) To Catalyze Future Change At An Organization With A Strong Social Mission
  12. Actual Number of Journals
  13. Actual Repayments
  14. Actual Repayments To Date
  15. Amount Outstanding
  16. Amount Repaid Vs Expected Rate
  17. Amount due to Lenders after Currency Exchange Loss
  18. Amount of Currency Exchange Loss
  19. Amount of Currency Exchange Loss
  20. Amount of Currency Exchange Loss covered by Field Partner
  21. Amount of Currency Exchange Loss to Lenders
  22. Amount of Ended Loans
  23. Amount of Ended Loans Defaulted
  24. Amount of Paying Back Loans
  25. Amount of Paying Back Loans 1 Day Late
  26. Amount of Paying Back Loans 1 Month Late
  27. Amount of Paying Back Loans Delinquent
  28. Amount of Raised Inactive Loans
  29. Amount of Refunded Loans
  30. Annualized Interest Rate
  31. Anti-Poverty Focus
  32. Average Dollars Raised Per Day Per Loan
  33. Average GDP Per Capita (PPP) in Local Country
  34. Average Group Loan Size
  35. Average Individual Loan Size
  36. Average Interest Rate Borrower Pays To Kiva Field Partner
  37. Average Loan Size
  38. Average Loan Size (% of Per Capita Income)
  39. Average Loan Size / GDP Per Capita (PPP)
  40. Average Loan Term
  41. Average Local Money Lender Interest Rate
  42. Average Number Of Comments Per Journal
  43. Average Number Of Entrepreneurs Per Group
  44. Average Number Of Recommendations Per Journal
  45. Average Time To Fund A Loan
  46. Avg Annual Income
  47. Avg annual currency fluctuation
  48. Borrower / Group Name
  49. Borrower Family Name
  50. Borrower Given Name
  51. Borrower Privacy
  52. Borrower Progress from Previous Loan
  53. Borrower and Loan Use Description
  54. Borrower and Loan Use Description
  55. Capital
  56. Carry-Over Balance
  57. Choose Image File
  58. Client ID
  59. Client ID
  60. Client Protection Principles
  61. Client Voice
  62. Client Waiver
  63. Comments
  64. Country
  65. Country
  66. Cumulative Repaid
  67. Currency
  68. Currency Exchange Gained/(Lost)
  69. Currency Exchange Loss
  70. Currency Exchange Loss Rate
  71. Currency Loss Absorbed By Kiva Lenders
  72. Date Disbursed
  73. Date Funded
  74. Date Listed
  75. Date Posted
  76. Default Protection
  77. Default Rate
  78. Default Rate
  79. Default Rate Notes
  80. Defaulted Amount
  81. Delinquency Rate
  82. Delinquency Rate Notes
  83. Disbursal Date
  84. Disbursal Date
  85. Do Lender Messages combine with email?
  86. Entrepreneurial Support
  87. Evidence Supporting Repayment Likelihood
  88. Exchange Rate
  89. Exchange Rate at Posting
  90. Expand your impact by posting loans on Facebook.
  91. Expand your impact by posting repayments on Facebook.
  92. Expand your team's reach by posting your message on Facebook.
  93. Expected Number of Journals
  94. Expected Repayments
  95. Expected Repayments To Date
  96. Explanation of Currency Exchange Loss to Lenders on this Repayment
  97. Facilitation of Savings
  98. Family and Community Empowerment
  99. Field Partner
  100. Field Partner Risk Rating
  101. Field Partner Staff
  102. Field Partner Website
  103. Field Partner loan disbursals
  104. First Repayment Date
  105. Fundraising Status
  106. GDP per capita (PPP)
  107. Going, going, gone!
  108. Group Client ID
  109. Group ID
  110. Group Loan ID
  111. Group Name
  112. HTML Cheat Sheet for Writing Journals
  113. How are the number of team loans calculated
  114. How can I print out the Gift Certificates I purchased?
  115. How can I send Lender Messages?
  116. How do I add loans to my lending team?
  117. How do I become the captain of a lending team?
  118. How do I create a lending team for my company?
  119. How do I create a lending team for my special event?
  120. How do I create a lending team?
  121. How do I find a lending team?
  122. How do I join a lending team?
  123. How do I make someone else the captain of my lending team?
  124. How do I quit a lending team?
  125. How do I recruit people to my lending team?
  126. How do I set my preferred team?
  127. How do I use my Gift Certificate to make a loan?
  128. How do Lending Teams work?
  129. How do repayments work?
  130. How is this calculated?
  131. I didn't receive an email with my Gift Code
  132. I'm a member of more than one lending team. How do I pick which team my loan counts towards?
  133. I'm already connected. Why are you asking again?
  134. If your MFI has been approved to mark no repayment exceptions for the current period
  135. Image
  136. Individual Client ID
  137. Individual Loan ID
  138. Infant Mortality Rate (per 1000)
  139. Innovation
  140. Interest
  141. Interest Rate Calculation
  142. Interest Rate Type
  143. Invoicing Status
  144. Journal Frequency (Average Per Loan Per Year)
  145. Journaling Rate
  146. Journaling Rate For Current Month
  147. Kiva Entrepreneurs
  148. Kiva Fundraising Notes
  149. Kiva Round-Up
  150. Labor Force
  151. Language of Description
  152. Last Reported Repayment
  153. Lenders Repaid
  154. Life Expectancy
  155. Literacy Rate
  156. Loan ID
  157. Loan Product
  158. Loan Term
  159. Loan Type
  160. Loan Use
  161. Loan Use - This borrower will use this loan: (for example, "to pay for...")
  162. Loans To Women Borrowers
  163. Loans at Risk (PAR 1)
  164. Location
  165. Mix Profile
  166. Net Balance For
  167. Network Affiliation
  168. Not Yet Reported
  169. Number Of Ended Loans
  170. Number Of Ended Loans Defaulted
  171. Number Of Paying Back Loans
  172. Number Of Paying Back Loans 1 Day Late
  173. Number Of Paying Back Loans 1 Month Late
  174. Number Of Raised Inactive Loans
  175. Number Of Refunded Loans
  176. Number of Group Members
  177. Number of Installments
  178. Number of Loans Delinquent
  179. Official Language
  180. Overall Journaling Rate
  181. Overdue Balance Due
  182. Owed to Kiva
  183. Par 1
  184. Par 30
  185. Partner Email Contact
  186. Paying Back Loans 1 Day Late
  187. Paying Back Loans 1 Month Late
  188. Paying Back Loans Delinquent
  189. Population
  190. Population Below Poverty Line
  191. Portfolio Yield
  192. Portfolio Yield Notes
  193. Preliminary Statement
  194. Primary Activity
  195. Primary Sector
  196. Primary Sector
  197. Primary Sector
  198. Principal
  199. Profitability (Return on Assets)
  200. Refund Rate
  201. Repayment Due Dates
  202. Repayment Schedule
  203. Repayment Term
  204. Repayment in Local Currency
  205. Repayment in USD
  206. Repayments
  207. Repayments to be Invoiced
  208. Repayments to be Invoiced (Currency As Reported)
  209. Show Graph
  210. Show on Kiva
  211. Social Performance
  212. Social Performance Reporting Level
  213. Spanish
  214. Spread the word about this loan on Facebook!
  215. Start Date On Kiva
  216. Successfully Reported
  217. Time On Kiva
  218. Total
  219. Total Amount Due By
  220. Total Amount Lent
  221. Total Amount Lost
  222. Total Amount Refunded and Expired
  223. Total Amount Repaid
  224. Total Journals
  225. Total Kiva Loans Raised
  226. Total Loans
  227. Updated Nightly
  228. Vulnerable Group Focus
  229. What are Lender Messages?
  230. What does it mean that my loan is not reserved?
  231. What is my preferred team?
  232. Where do I read my Lender Messages?
  233. Who can use Lender Messages?
  234. Why Kiva Works With This Field Partner
  235. Why is the entrepreneur listed as anonymous?
  236. Will a physical card be mailed to me?
  237. Will my Gift Certificate recipient be able to choose their own loans?
  238. Wires Received After Application to Overdue Balance
  239. Your Internal Group ID
  1. Click here to learn how to create a CSV file.:

    Step 1: In Excel, enter the information you want in the appropriate columns





    Step 2: Choose "Save As" from the File menu. Excel will display the dialog box below.




    Step 3:In the "Save as type" dropdown list at the bottom of the box, choose "CSV (Comma delimited)."



    Step 4: Click the "Save" button at the bottom of the box.



    Step 5: If Excel gives you a warning that not all Excel features can be preserved in the format chosen, choose to continue saving the file in CSV format.


  2. Click here to learn how to create a CSV file.:

    Step 1: In Excel, enter the information you want in the appropriate columns





    Step 2: Choose "Save As" from the File menu. Excel will display the dialog box below.




    Step 3:In the "Save as type" dropdown list at the bottom of the box, choose "CSV (Comma delimited)."



    Step 4: Click the "Save" button at the bottom of the box.



    Step 5: If Excel gives you a warning that not all Excel features can be preserved in the format chosen, choose to continue saving the file in CSV format.


  3. Term:
    Defn
  4. 1) To Push The Frontier Of Access To Financial Services:

    In places like Afghanistan, Palestine, and post-conflict Sierra Leone, you can imagine challenges to getting loans into the hands of the working poor. In more stable countries like Kenya, Vietnam, and Costa Rica, the situation is different but the story is the same: funding is not available to meet the demand for microfinance. Undesirable, risky investments and skewed perceptions can make it very difficult for these microfinance institutions to get the funding they need to provide microloans and other financial services.

    Why it matters: In such regions, your Kiva loan joins many others to push the frontier of where microfinance is able to serve unbanked people. So long as you consider the increased risk of lending in such an area, this is a very good thing!


  5. 2a) To Create Or Expand Offerings To Interesting Client Segments:

    A critical part of effective microfinance is targeting and outreach. Through targeting and outreach, a Field Partner can deliver microfinance to populations excluded from the conventional financial sector. Depending upon its mission, the Field Partner may choose to serve women, rural residents, indigenous farmers, youth, or perhaps internally displaced people or people living with HIV/AIDS. For Field Partners in this category, funding from Kiva lenders allows them to serve (or expand services to) a particular unbanked or under-served client (or borrower) segment. In many cases, funding from Kiva lenders encourages these Field Partners to serve poorer borrowers than they traditionally were able to serve. One compelling example is a Field Partner that offers specialized services to women coming out of human trafficking to help them achieve independence and dignity.

    Why it matters: Kiva believes that targeting the right clients can lead to real change in the lives of the working poor. Your loan joins many others to fund a particularly marginalized group in the Field Partner’s target area. Without funding from Kiva lenders, this group could not be served as well.


  6. 2b) To Create Or Expand Interesting Product Offerings:

    Good Field Partners offer high-quality services that are well adapted to fit the needs of their clients (or borrowers). These services must be appropriately delivered and structured to benefit clients. Some examples of interesting products are smaller loans than have historically been offered, village loans, loans with a lower interest rate, tailored agriculture loans, education and green loans. Generally, these products are riskier and often microfinance institutions cannot afford to take that risk. For Field Partners in this category, Kiva funding allows them to provide or expand a loan product that is not provided (or is under-provided) locally.

    Why it matters: Kiva believes that innovative offerings can lead to real change in the lives of the working poor. Your loan joins many others and allows this Field Partner to fund specialized financial products that borrowers truly need and want. Without funding from Kiva lenders, this product could not be affordably offered.


  7. 2c) To Create Or Expand Interesting Wraparound Services:

    In many cases, access to financial services is not enough to break the cycle of poverty. Kiva targets organizations with innovative, non-financial services. These “wraparound” services seek to develop the client (or borrower), not just the business. There are many kinds of wraparound services, including health insurance, business consultations and financial literacy training, granary services for farmers, solar panel loans for energy efficiency and group empowerment from village banking social cohesion. Funding from Kiva lenders allows Field Partners in this category to provide or expand wraparound services that are not provided or under-provided locally.

    Why it matters: Kiva believes that innovative wraparound services combined with business loans can lead to real change in the lives of the working poor. Your loan joins many others to fund Field Partners leading the way in providing for many of the needs of their borrowers. Without funding from Kiva lenders, these services could not affordably be offered.


  8. 3a) To Reward Offerings To Interesting Client Segments:

    A critical part of effective microfinance is targeting and outreach. Through targeting and outreach, a Field Partner delivers microfinance to populations excluded from the conventional financial sector. Depending upon its mission, the Field Partner may choose to serve women, rural residents, indigenous farmers, youth or perhaps internally displaced people or people living with HIV/AIDS. For Field Partners in this category, funding from Kiva lenders creates incentives for serving particular unbanked or under-served client segments.

    Why it matters: Kiva believes that working with certain high-performing Field Partners makes a statement that innovative targeting and outreach is good for clients and can be good for the bottom line. Your loan joins many others to send a message that social responsibility is in itself a worthy pursuit.


  9. 3b) To Reward Interesting Product Offerings:

    Good Field Partners offer high-quality financial services that are well adapted to fit the needs of their clients (or borrowers). These services must be appropriately delivered and structured to benefit clients. Some examples of interesting products are smaller loans than have been historically been offered, savings and insurance, loans with a lower interest rate, tailored agriculture loans, education and green loans. Generally, these products are riskier and often MFIs cannot afford to take that risk. For Field Partners in this category, Kiva funding creates incentives for providing products not otherwise available locally.

    Why it matters: Kiva believes that working with certain high-performing Field Partners makes a statement that innovative financial products are good for clients and can be good for the bottom line. Your loan joins many others to send a message that social responsibility is in itself a worthy pursuit.


  10. 3c) To Reward Interesting Wraparound Services:

    In many cases, access to financial services is not enough to break the cycle of poverty. Kiva targets organizations with innovative, non-financial services. These wraparound services seek to develop the client (or borrower), not just the business. There are many kinds of wraparound services, including health insurance, business consultations and financial literacy training, granary services for farmers, solar panel loans for energy efficiency and group empowerment from village banking social cohesion. For Field Partners in this category, funding from Kiva lenders creates incentives for organizations providing innovative wraparound services not otherwise available locally.

    Why it matters: Kiva believes that working with certain high-performing organizations makes a statement that innovative wraparound services are good for clients and can be good for the bottom line. Your loan joins many others to send a message that social responsibility is in itself a worthy pursuit.


  11. 4) To Catalyze Future Change At An Organization With A Strong Social Mission:

    Providing microfinance can be a very complicated business and, at times, an organization must take stock of its strengths and build plans for the future. For Field Partners in this category, Kiva funding supports institutions that are likely—over the short- to medium-term—to serve unbanked or under-served client segments, to offer innovative financial products, or to offer innovative wraparound services.

    Why it matters: Kiva believes in the power of potential, both for our borrowers and for our Field Partners. Your loan joins many others to create future growth at the Field Partner.


  12. Actual Number of Journals:
    This is the actual number of journals posted by this partner.
  13. Actual Repayments:
    These are the actual repayments made by the Entrepreneur to the Field Partner and from the Field Partner to Kiva. Once we receive the repayments from the Field Partner, we deposit them into your Kiva account.
  14. Actual Repayments To Date:
    Total actual amount of repayments made by this partner to date.
  15. Amount Outstanding:
    This is the cash amount outstanding to Kiva. It is calculated as (Sum of wires sent by Kiva - Sum of wires received by Kiva - Defaulted amount - Currency losses absorbed by Kiva lenders).

    This number updates every time this page is opened.
  16. Amount Repaid Vs Expected Rate:
    The ratio of actual repayments to Kiva lenders vs. expected repayments at this point in time. The actual value can include prepayments, with the result that this number can sometimes exceed 100%.
  17. Amount due to Lenders after Currency Exchange Loss:
    This is the net repayment to lenders after accounting for Currency Exchange Loss.


    How this is calculated:


    Actual Entrepreneur Repayment (USD) + Amount of Currency Exchange Loss covered by Field Partner
  18. Amount of Currency Exchange Loss:
    Amount of loans not repaid due to currency fluctuations.


    When lending funds across national boundaries, the local currency in the Field Partner's country of operation may lose some of its value relative to the USD, thus requiring the Field Partner to use more of its local currency to reimburse Kiva in USD. Kiva offers Field Partners the option to protect themselves against severe currency fluctuations (a US dollar appreciation of over 10% relative to the local currency) by sharing any losses greater than 10% with Kiva lenders.* By bearing these losses, lenders are able to protect the Field Partner and its borrowers from catastrophic currency devaluations.
  19. Amount of Currency Exchange Loss:
    While the entrepreneur may have repaid the expected amount, the severe fluctuation in Currency Exchange Rates between the time the loan was posted and the time this payment was billed resulted in the US Dollar value of the repayment being much less than expected.


    How this is calculated:


    Expected Repayment Amount (USD) - Actual Entrepreneur Repayment (Local Currency) / Exchange Rate on Date Billed


    For more on Currency Exchange Loss, visit Kiva's Help Center.
  20. Amount of Currency Exchange Loss covered by Field Partner:
    This is the amount of the cost of currency fluctuation that the Field Partner will cover. The Field Partner will cover the cost in local currency of up to 10% appreciation of the US Dollar relative to the local currency.


    How this is calculated:


    10% * Expected Repayment Amount (Local Currency) / Exchange Rate on Date Billed
  21. Amount of Currency Exchange Loss to Lenders:
    This is the portion of the cost of currency fluctuation that lenders bear. The Field Partner is responsible for covering the cost of the first 10% of appreciation (of the U.S. Dollar) in local currency. Because this is a loan in which "Currency Exchange Loss" is possible, lenders cover the remainder of the cost.


    How this is calculated:


    Amount of Currency Exchange Loss - Amount of Currency Exchange Loss covered by Field Partner
  22. Amount of Ended Loans:
    Total amount of loans raised and disbursed which are no longer in the process of being paid back by an entrepreneur. This excludes refunded loans.
  23. Amount of Ended Loans Defaulted:
    Remaining balance due on ended loans which are not repaid in full.
  24. Amount of Paying Back Loans:
    Total amount of loans raised and disbursed which are in the process of being paid back by an entrepreneur.
  25. Amount of Paying Back Loans 1 Day Late:
    Defn
  26. Amount of Paying Back Loans 1 Month Late:
    Defn
  27. Amount of Paying Back Loans Delinquent:
    Current principal balance of all Paying Back Loans with one or more repayments past due.


    How this is calculated:


    • Once a loan becomes Paying Back, repayments are expected according to a monthly schedule established by the field partner at the time of loan posting.

    • The first monthly installment is due on a date established by the partner.

    • The partner has between one to two months after collecting from the entrepreneur to send Kiva the repayments.

    • When Kiva receives the repayments, they mark the payment as received and return that money to the lenders.

    • If an installment has not been fully repaid and is past due, the remaining principal balance is considered late



    Example with a $1000 loan paid evenly over a 10 month loan term, that becomes Paying Back on January 1 and has its first repayment on January 30:


    • The monthly installment due = $100 ($1000 loan amount / 10 month term).

    • The first monthly installment is due to the partner on January 30. Kiva invoices the partner for the payment on February 15 and expects to receive this payment by March 1.

    • On March 2, assume that only $50 of the expected $100 installment is repaid.

    • On March 2, the "Amount of Paying Back Loans Late" = $950 (the remaining principal balance).

    • On March 3, assume that the other $50 is repaid and the January installment due is repaid in full.

    • On March 4, the "Amount of Paying Back Loans Late" = $0


  28. Amount of Raised Inactive Loans:
    Total amount of loans raised but not yet disbursed to the intended entrepreneur.
    Typically, loans are disbursed within 30 days of being raised on Kiva's website.
  29. Amount of Refunded Loans:
    Total amount of loans refunded to lenders due to an error.
    Errors vary from the unintentional (e.g. Field Partner accidentally uploaded a
    duplicate Entrepreneur profile which received funding and recognized it later) to more serious issues
    (e.g. a Kiva audit discovered that loan funds were used inappropriately).
    In the latter case, Kiva will attempt to refund lenders with any funds recovered.
    In all cases, information about why the refund was issued is published on each loan listing page.
  30. Annualized Interest Rate:
    Enter the annualized interest rate for this loan, not including any additional fees. The annualized interest rate (also called the effective interest rate) refers to interest charged to the borrower on this loan product by the MFI, not to interest charged by Kiva to the MFI, since Kiva does not charge interest to MFI partners.
  31. Anti-Poverty Focus:

    The work of most microfinance institutions helps to combat poverty, but these Field Partners do even more.


  32. Average Dollars Raised Per Day Per Loan:
    For any given entrepreneur listed on Kiva, the average amount of loan funds raised from the internet community in a 24 hour period. It is a more direct measure of the relative 'popularity' of entrepreneurs posted by this Field Partner vs the Kiva average (the higher the rate of funding, the more popular).





    Popularity can be driven by a variety of loan "investment" factors, including:

    • Social return - the social impact as perceived from entrepreneur's life situation, family size, loan purpose, etc

    • Financial return - the loan principal repayment likelihood as perceived from the business description, Field Partner performance, etc.

    • Emotional return - the relative preference or affinity for a particular country, gender, industry, photo, etc


  33. Average GDP Per Capita (PPP) in Local Country:
    Provides insight into the approximate average yearly income of an individual living in a particular country. Gross domestic product (GDP) is the value of all final goods and services produced within the nation in a given year. This figure divides GDP by the total population of the country.
  34. Average Group Loan Size:
    Average size of all loans to a group of entrepreneurs on Kiva.org.
  35. Average Individual Loan Size:
    Average size of all loans to an individual entrepreneur on Kiva.org.
  36. Average Interest Rate Borrower Pays To Kiva Field Partner:
    The self reported average rate charged by the Field Partner to the entrepreneur. Note that Kiva.org does not currently take a cut of the interest rate charged by Field Partners and instead relies on an optional lender fees/donations to help pay for running our website (small core staff, rent, servers, etc).


    If the Field Partner interest rate seems high, consider the following:





    1. Field Partner interest rates are a highly affordable alternative to the local money lender

      • Local money lenders - often the only option for poor entrepreneurs to get a loan - charge interest rates ranging from 60% to 800% annualized.

      • A poor entrepreneur can generate greater benefits from additional units of capital than can a highly capitalized business, because she or he begins with so little.

      • According to the World Bank, studies covering India, Kenya, and the Philippines found that the average annual return on investments by microbusinesses ranged from 117 to 847 percent.





    2. The costs of making a micro-loan in the developing world are higher versus larger loans in the West.

      • Cost of screening - Field Partners must screen entrepreneurs who commonly have no credit history, no collateral, are frequently illiterate, and often live in remote areas. To responsibly assess the credit worthiness of each entrepreneur, the cost is higher than the West where most everyone has a credit score and screening / loan application can be done electronically.

      • Cost of in person collections - Field Partner staff typically travel to each entrepreneur on a monthly basis to make collections. Compared to the West, where mail and internet repayments are standard, the costs are higher.

      • Cost as a size of the loan - If the Field Partner's actual cost per loan is $25, the percentage cost is 0.25 percent for a $10,000 loan, but 25 percent for a $100 loan.




    3. Field Partners must charge an interest rate that allows them to pursue their social impact agenda sustainably.

      • In order for Field Partners to reach more of the poor with relatively low interest loans (vs. local money lender), they need to cover their costs.

      • Given the higher costs of microloans discussed above, Field Partners must charge a sufficient interest rate.

      • Kiva aspires to provide transparency around the social impact and relative Field Partner interest rates in order to ensure to reward Field Partner that successfully create social value while lowering their costs to do so.




  37. Average Loan Size:
    Average size of all loans per entrepreneur on Kiva.org.
  38. Average Loan Size (% of Per Capita Income):

    The Field Partner's average loan size is expressed as a percentage of the country's gross national income per capita.


    Loans that are smaller (that is, as a lower percentage of gross national income per capita) are generally made to more economically disadvantaged populations. However, these same loans are generally more costly for the microfinance institution to originate, disburse and collect.


  39. Average Loan Size / GDP Per Capita (PPP):
    Provides insight into Field Partner's depth of outreach. In other words, the relative poverty level of the entrepreneurs selected by this Field Partner.


    Average Loan Size / GDP Per Capita (PPP) Rule of Thumb:


    • If less than 20% = the poorest of the poor are being reached.

    • If between 20% - 149% = the middle poor are being reached.

    • If between 150% - 249% = the upper poor are being reached.

    • If over 250% = the middle class or established small businesses are being reached.



    Source: Adapted from the Microbanking Bulletin published by the MIX Market.
  40. Average Loan Term:
    The average amount of time in months allotted to the entrepreneur to repay a loan. Note: If a loan is not fully repaid by the end of the loan term, the Field Partner may choose to continue to attempt collections for up to 6 months in order to recover funds.
  41. Average Local Money Lender Interest Rate:
    Interest rate charged by local money lender, who is typically the only alternative to the Field Partner in the area they serve.
  42. Average Number Of Comments Per Journal:
    Lenders can leave a comment on any journal they read. This figure measures the average number of comments per journal.
  43. Average Number Of Entrepreneurs Per Group:
    Average number of entrepreneurs per group on Kiva.org. This does not include individual loans.
  44. Average Number Of Recommendations Per Journal:
    If lenders like what they read in a journal, they can 'recommend' it by clicking a button on the "Journals" page. This figure measures the average number of recommendation per journal.
  45. Average Time To Fund A Loan:
    Average length of time in days that it takes for a loan to be fully funded on Kiva.org. It is an indirect measure of the relative 'popularity' of businesses posted by this Field Partner vs the Kiva average (the quicker to fully fund, the more popular).




    Popularity can be driven by a variety of loan "investment" factors, including:


    • Social return - the social impact as perceived from entrepreneur's life situation, family size, loan purpose, etc

    • Financial return - the loan principal repayment likelihood as perceived from the business description, Field Partner performance, etc.

    • Emotional return - the relative preference or affinity for a particular country, gender, industry, photo, etc


  46. Avg Annual Income:
    The average annual income per person in this country, given in US Dollars. This is the GDP per capita (PPP), which is the value of all final goods and services produced within the nation in a given year.
  47. Avg annual currency fluctuation:
    The average percentage the local currency exchange rate has fluctuated over the last 5 years when compared to the US Dollar.

    To learn more about historic currency rates, visit www.xe.com


  48. Borrower / Group Name:
    This field is optional. If this is an individual loan and the
    business does not already have a name, you may leave this field blank
    or choose a name that reflects the type of business and the character
    of the entrepreneur. The default business name is the borrower's name. If this is a group loan and the group does not
    already have a name, you may leave this field blank or choose a name
    that reflects the character of the group. The default group name is [group leader]'s Group.
  49. Borrower Family Name:
    This is the name the borrower shares with his or her family. In the United States, for example, this is the 'Last Name', but it is said first in some countries.
  50. Borrower Given Name:
    If the borrower has more than one name, list them all here, except the family name. If the borrower has a nickname (a short name which people commonly call them) enter it first with an apostrophe on either side.
  51. Borrower Privacy:
    These settings control whether borrower given names and family names appear on the Kiva website. They also control whether the borrower location is displayed publicly.
  52. Borrower Progress from Previous Loan:

    In this field, provide answers to questions like:



    • Why is the borrower taking out another loan?

    • What will the borrower buy with the borrowed funds?

    • How did their last loan affect the business?

    • Have their family circumstances changed since the last loan?


  53. Borrower and Loan Use Description:

    Thank you for using our Relisting feature!
    The text below is what you entered when you first posted this client on Kiva.
    When this new loan is shown on the Kiva website, only the first paragraph of the original loan description will be visible.
    You can add additional information about the client's last loan and new loan in the "Borrower Progress from Previous Loan" field above.


  54. Borrower and Loan Use Description:

    The purpose of the description is to explain to lenders who the borrower is and what the loan will be used for. The types of things to include could be:



    • the borrower's personal history (such as age and family situation)

    • the borrower's experience in this type of business (why they chose it, how long have they been in it)

    • information about the borrower's local context (country or regional information, challenges the borrower may face)

    • what the loan is for and how this loan will help the borrower

    • the borrower's hopes and dreams for the future

    • the borrower's borrowing history (how many loans have they taken out with your organization)



    Remember - lenders enjoy reading about the life of a borrower and learning more about the culture and context of where they live and work. Keep in mind that lenders might not know about the country or the business of a borrower. Providing these details helps lenders understand this, find connections with the borrower and make decisions about whether they want to fund the loan.


  55. Capital:
    Capital of specified country
  56. Carry-Over Balance:
    "Carry-Over Balance" is any amount still unpaid from the previous billing period. It is added to the current statement to capture the full amount that is owed to Kiva.
  57. Choose Image File:
    If this is an individual loan, show a picture (.gif or .jpg) of your
    borrower at their place of work. If this is a
    group, post a picture of the entire group. Remember for group loans
    you can only raise funds in the group loan for those borrowers
    who are in the picture.
  58. Client ID:
    Enter the identifier assigned to the borrower in the Field Partner's internal records. Entering this now will help you locate the borrower later in the Kiva system.
  59. Client ID:
    If this is an individual loan and the borrower has an ID already
    assigned in the in the MFI's own records, enter it here. (optional) If
    this is a group loan and the group has an ID already assigned in the MFI's
    own records, enter it here (optional).
  60. Client Protection Principles:
    The Smart Campaign is a global campaign committed to embedding client protection practices into the institutional culture and operations of the microfinance industry.


    The Smart Campaign embodies a set of core principles for the treatment of microfinance clients - the minimum standards that clients should expect to receive when doing business with a microfinance institution. The principles at the heart of Smart Microfinance are:


    • Appropriate product design and delivery

    • Prevention of over-indebtedness

    • Transparency

    • Responsible pricing

    • Fair and respectful treatment of clients

    • Privacy of client data

    • Mechanisms for complaint resolution


    For more information click here.
  61. Client Voice:

    These Field Partners use feedback from the people they serve and adapt their business practices and product offerings to meet their needs.


  62. Client Waiver:
    The person uploading this loan should confirm that the Field Partner has a signed client waiver for this borrower before proceeding. The staff member can confirm this in many ways. For example, they could call the staff member who collected the information about the borrower or they could request to have a scanned copy of the waiver emailed to them with the other information about the borrower. For more information about Kiva's client waiver policies, visit the Partner Help Center.
  63. Comments:
    This field will show you the status of any repayment. It can be:



    • Repayment Received: Kiva received the repayment and returned the funds to Kiva lenders.

    • Delinquent: The due date for the repayment has passed and the funds have not been returned to Kiva lenders. This can be due either to the Entrepreneur or Field Partner falling behind on repayment. Click "Show Advanced" on the repayment schedule to see an explanation of why the repayment is late.

    • Entrepreneur behind in repayment: The Field Partner has reported not collecting the funds from the Entrepreneur.

    • Field partner behind in repayment: The Field Partner has reported fully collecting funds from the Entrepreneur but hasn't sent them to Kiva.

    • $X lost to currency fluctuation: The U.S. Dollar has appreciated severely relative to the local currency, causing the entrepreneur's repayment to be worth less than expected. While the Field Partner covered the cost in local currency of the first 10% of appreciation, the remainder was passed on as a loss to lenders.


  64. Country:
    The country in which the entrepreneur or group of entrepreneurs resides and will be receiving the loan. It is important to consider risks particular to a given country when considering the riskiness of a given loan.
  65. Country:
    Name of country where featured Microfinance Institution (see Field Partner) is located.
  66. Cumulative Repaid:
    Defn
  67. Currency:
    The local currency unit in which the loan is disbursed to the entrepreneur or group of entrepreneurs. Entrepreneurs will repay the Field Partner in this currency unit as well.
  68. Currency Exchange Gained/(Lost):
    For all local currency (non-USD) denominated loans, this is the total amount your MFI has gained or lost from fluctuations in currency since June 15, 2009.
  69. Currency Exchange Loss:
    When lending funds across national boundaries, the local currency in the Field Partner's country of operation may lose some of its value relative to the USD, thus requiring the Field Partner to use more of its local currency to reimburse Kiva in USD. Kiva offers Field Partners the option to protect themselves against severe currency fluctuations (a US dollar appreciation of over 10% relative to the local currency) by sharing any losses greater than 10% with Kiva lenders.* By bearing these losses, lenders are able to protect the Field Partner and its borrowers from catastrophic currency devaluations.

    The Field Partner-specified Currency Exchange Loss to lenders can be one of three values: Covered, Possible, or N/A.



    Covered

    The Field Partner has opted to cover any losses on the loan that are due to currency fluctuation. Lenders will not bear losses due to currency fluctuation.


    Possible

    The Field Partner has opted not to cover losses on the loan that are due to currency fluctuation. In this situation, lenders face additional risk because they will bear losses greater than 10%.


    N/A

    The Field Partner disburses loans to borrowers in USD so their loans are not subject to any foreign currency conversion.


    *Note that loans posted before April 16, 2012 with currency exchange risk possible only share losses greater than 20% with lenders.

  70. Currency Exchange Loss Rate:
    The percentage of loans for which losses have been realized due to currency fluctuations.


    How this is calculated:

    Amount of Currency Exchange Loss / Total Loans
  71. Currency Loss Absorbed By Kiva Lenders:
    You are not responsible for this amount. This is the amount of loss Kiva lenders will bear because of currency devaluation.
  72. Date Disbursed:
    Each of Kiva's Field Partners operate a little differently, and while some need to wait for Kiva to wire the loan funds to them before they can disburse the loans, others have funds on hand - from savings or working capital - which they can use to front the funds before they receive the wire from Kiva. Additionally, most Field Partners also have their own funds which they use to finance some loans, and so in some cases the Field Partner even disburses the loan before it is funded on Kiva, knowing that if the loan is not funded they have the funds to finance the loan themselves. This is why the loan disbursal date can vary, from up to 30 days after the loan is funded, to even before the loan was funded on Kiva.
  73. Date Funded:
    This is the date that the loan request was fully funded.
  74. Date Listed:
    This is the date that the loan began fundraising on Kiva.
  75. Date Posted:
    This is the date that the loan request was posted to Kiva by our Field Partner.
  76. Default Protection:
    In the event of an entrepreneur default, the Field Partner will cover the loan principal.
  77. Default Rate:
    The percentage of Ended Loans (no longer paying back) which have failed to repay (measured in dollar volume, not units).

    How this is calculated: Amount of Ended Loans Defaulted / Amount of Ended Loans
  78. Default Rate:
    Percentage of Ended Loans (no longer paying back) which have failed to repay (measured in dollar volume, not units).


    How this is calculated:


    Amount of Ended Loans Defaulted / Amount of Ended Loans


    Notes:


    • Many Field Partners do not yet have many Ended Loans due to their short history on Kiva (see "Time on Kiva"). A more meaningful indicator of principal risk is "Delinquency Rate".

    • For loans that are delinquent at the end of a loan term, Kiva allows the Field Partner 6 additional months to attempt collections before deeming the loan as Defaulted.


  79. Default Rate Notes:
    Additional notes provided by Kiva Staff regarding this field partner's default rate.
  80. Defaulted Amount:
    The total outstanding value of an MFI's defaulted Kiva loans, measured in USD. Kiva considers a loan to be defaulted when it is marked as such by the partner or after 6 months of non-payment.
  81. Delinquency Rate:
    The percentage of Paying Back Loans by this partner that are past due in repayment. This percentage is exposed to lenders on the Kiva site.

    How this is calculated: Amount of payments past due / Total outstanding principal balance the Field Partner has with Kiva.
  82. Delinquency Rate Notes:
    Additional notes provided by Kiva Staff regarding this field partner's delinquency rate.
  83. Disbursal Date:
    Each of Kiva's Field Partners operate a little differently, and while some need to wait for Kiva to wire the loan funds to them before they can disburse the loans, others have funds on hand - from savings or working capital - which they can use to front the funds before they receive the wire from Kiva. Additionally, most Field Partners also have their own funds which they use to finance some loans, and so in some cases the Field Partner even disburses the loan before it is funded on Kiva, knowing that if the loan is not funded they have the funds to finance the loan themselves. This is why the loan disbursal date can vary, from up to 30 days after the loan is funded, to even before the loan was funded on Kiva.
  84. Disbursal Date:
    Enter the date when funds were or will be paid out to the borrower or group of borrowers. For a group loan, enter the date the funds were or will be disbursed to the group leader.
  85. Do Lender Messages combine with email?:
    Lender Messages send out emails to the public Lenders who receive them. Lenders can choose to opt out of these emails by going to the My Portfolio -> Account -> Email Preferences page. Lender Messages do not expose user email addresses or other private information to the public.
  86. Entrepreneurial Support:

    These Field Partners offer training and support to help people start, manage and grow their businesses.


  87. Evidence Supporting Repayment Likelihood:
    Kiva determines each Field Partner's Risk Rating based on:



    Factors (Outside of Kiva) Affecting Risk Rating:


    1. Recent Financial Audits, Credit Ratings and Independent Evaluations

    2. Most Reputable Outside Funder and Network Affiliations

    3. Existing Loan Portfolio Size and Risk

    4. Organizational Age and Sustainability



    Factors (Driven by Kiva) Affecting Risk Rating:


    1. Kiva Data Verification Audits:
      Kiva commissions certified local audit firms to randomly check several entrepreneurs listed on the Kiva website to ensure data accuracy (e.g. that the funds really reached the entrepreneur).



    2. Journaling Rate:
      For each loan, Kiva requires at least one journal update, before or at the end of the loan term, about the impact of the loan on the entrepreneur's life.

    3. Kiva Repayment Performance Over Time:
      Like other online marketplaces (e.g. eBay), Kiva incorporates the long term repayment performance of each Field Partner into their Risk Rating allowing less reputable Field Partners to build their reputation online.

    4. Bank Statement Reviews:
      For select Field Partners with lower Risk Rating, Kiva monitors the Bank Statement in order to verify the flow of funds and note any major discrepancies.

  88. Exchange Rate:
    The amount of local currency for this entrepreneur that is equivalent to 1 US Dollar. The exchange rate on a particular loan represents the rate on the date the loan was added by the Field Partner into the Kiva system.



    The Kiva Exchange rate is updated nightly from www.xe.com.
  89. Exchange Rate at Posting:
    This is the conversion rate for the loan when it was originally posted to Kiva and is used as the base rate for calculating currency exchange loss.
  90. Expand your impact by posting loans on Facebook.:
    This feature allows you to automatically publish the loans you make to your Facebook Wall. When enabled, a Facebook post will be published to your Facebook Wall every time you make a loan.
  91. Expand your impact by posting repayments on Facebook.:


    Repayment posts will occur every time you receive a notification of repayments in your account. This typically happens once a month, but may may happen more often depending on your notification settings. You can turn off repayment posts at any time in your Kiva account Facebook Preferences.
  92. Expand your team's reach by posting your message on Facebook.:
    The feature allows you to post your team messages to your Facebook page. Just connect your Kiva account to Facebook and permit Kiva to post to your page when you choose.


  93. Expected Number of Journals:
    This is the number of journals expected from this partner based on journal frequency selections at the time of business posting.
  94. Expected Repayments:
    This is the principal repayment schedule uploaded by the Field Partner at the point that the loan is posted. It outlines when the Field Partner expects to collect principal repayments from the entrepreneur.


    Note that this doesn't include interest, which may be charged by the Field Partner to the entrepreneur.
  95. Expected Repayments To Date:
    If all payments are made, the total amount of repayments expected from this partner to date.
  96. Explanation of Currency Exchange Loss to Lenders on this Repayment:
    Expected Repayment
    Expected Repayment Amount (USD):$0.00
    Exchange Rate on Date Posted to Kiva ():0.0000 = 1 USD
    Expected Repayment Amount (Local Currency):$0.00
    Actual Repayment
    Actual Entrepreneur Repayment (USD):$0.00
    Exchange Rate on Date Billed ():0.0000 = 1 USD
    Actual Entrepreneur Repayment (Local Currency):$0.00
    Currency Exchange Loss
    Amount of Currency Exchange Loss:$0.00
    Amount of Currency Exchange Loss covered by Field Partner:$0.00
    Amount of Currency Exchange Loss to Lenders:$0.00
    Amount Due to Lenders after Currency Exchange Loss:$0.00

    All Kiva Exchange Rates are updated nightly from www.xe.com.
  97. Facilitation of Savings:

    These Field Partners specifically promote savings as a practice to the people they serve.


  98. Family and Community Empowerment:

    These Field Partners offer support services that address the needs of their clients’ families: their health, education, and/or well-being.


  99. Field Partner:
    Kiva partners with microfinance institutions around the world. In doing so, Kiva gains access to outstanding and deserving
    entrepreneurs from impoverished communities.
    Our Field Partners are responsible for screening each entrepreneur and administering your loan.
  100. Field Partner Risk Rating:

    A Field Partner Risk Rating is a 1 to 5 star rating assigned to each Field Partner by Kiva's staff, with five stars indicating lower risk and one star indicating higher risk .
    It is based on evidence supporting a Field Partner's repayment likelihood and is
    intended to provide more insight for those who are sensitive to repayment risk.

    A 5-Star Field Partner is a highly established micro-lending institution with a proven track record,
    audited financials and high ratings from independent evaluators.
    In contrast, a 1-Star Field Partner is usually young and unproven --
    but with the potential to reach entrepreneurs not reached by more established Field Partners.
    Like eBay and other online marketplaces, Kiva hopes that this online lending platform will let
    unproven, riskier Field Partners build a great reputation through long term performance.
    In the process, they should be able to raise capital from other sources beyond Kiva
    to serve more of the poor in their area.
    You should lend via a Field Partner based on your tolerance for repayment risk. A Closed partner indicates that Kiva no longer works with the partner.











    "1-Star" Risk Rating

    A Field Partner Risk Rating is a 1 to 5 star rating assigned to each Field Partner by Kiva's staff, with five stars indicating lower risk and one star indicating higher risk .
    It is based on evidence supporting a Field Partner's repayment likelihood and is
    intended to provide more insight for those who are sensitive to repayment risk.

    A "1-Star" rating means that this Field Partner has a very limited amount of evidence demonstrating high likelihood of repayment.
    This "1-Star" rating is often a result of the Field Partner being a
    very young organization or the lack of immediately available, low cost
    of third-party verification options. Kiva enables "1-Star" partners
    to slowly build a verifiable performance track record online by
    allowing a very limited number of loan requests to be posted and
    funded. As a track record for effective loan management is
    established, the Field Partner's risk rating will improve. We
    recommend lending via a "1-Star" Field Partner if there is a unique
    connection to the entrepreneur and a very high tolerance for
    repayment uncertainty. If you prefer more outcome
    certainty, we recommend selecting an entrepreneur posted by a 3,
    4 or 5 star rated Field Partner
    .











    "2-Star" Risk Rating

    A Field Partner Risk Rating is a 1 to 5 star rating assigned to each Field Partner by Kiva's staff, with five stars indicating lower risk and one star indicating higher risk .
    It is based on evidence supporting a Field Partner's repayment likelihood and is
    intended to provide more insight for those who are sensitive to repayment risk.

    A "2-Star" rating means that this Field Partner has a limited amount of evidence demonstrating high likelihood of repayment.
    This "2-Star" rating is often a result of the Field
    Partner being a very young organization or the lack of immediately available, low cost of third-party
    verification options. Kiva enables "2-Star" partners to slowly build a verifiable performance track
    record online by allowing a limited number of loan requests to be posted and funded. As a track record for
    effective loan management is established, the Field Partner's risk rating will improve. We recommend lending
    via a "2-Star" Field Partner if there is a unique connection to the entrepreneur and a high tolerance for
    repayment uncertainty. If you prefer more outcome certainty, we recommend selecting an
    entrepreneur posted by a
    3, 4 or 5 star rated Field Partner.











    "3-Star" Risk Rating

    A Field Partner Risk Rating is a 1 to 5 star rating assigned to each Field Partner by Kiva's staff, with five stars indicating lower risk and one star indicating higher risk .
    It is based on evidence supporting a Field Partner's repayment likelihood and is
    intended to provide more insight for those who are sensitive to repayment risk.

    A "3-Star" rating means that this Field Partner has a moderate amount of evidence demonstrating high likelihood of repayment.
    It is not as firmly established as 4 or 5 star partners, but the organization has passed basic verification and shows promise if given a chance to build a track record over time. We recommend lending via a "3-Star" Field Partner if there is a unique connection to the entrepreneur and moderate tolerance for repayment uncertainty.











    "4-Star" Risk Rating

    A Field Partner Risk Rating is a 1 to 5 star rating assigned to each Field Partner by Kiva's staff, with five stars indicating lower risk and one star indicating higher risk .
    It is based on evidence supporting a Field Partner's repayment likelihood and is
    intended to provide more insight for those who are sensitive to repayment risk.

    A "4-Star" rating means that this Field Partner has a significant amount of evidence demonstrating high likelihood of repayment.
    Kiva has confidence in the Field Partner's ability to dutifully administer and collect your loan. Kiva will continue to monitor this Field Partner to adjust this rating over time. We recommend lending via a "4-Star" Field Partner if there is a unique connection to the entrepreneur and low tolerance for repayment uncertainty.











    "5-Star" Risk Rating

    A Field Partner Risk Rating is a 1 to 5 star rating assigned to each Field Partner by Kiva's staff, with five stars indicating lower risk and one star indicating higher risk .
    It is based on evidence supporting a Field Partner's repayment likelihood and is
    intended to provide more insight for those who are sensitive to repayment risk.

    A "5-Star" rating means that this Field Partner has a very significant amount of evidence demonstrating high likelihood of repayment.
    Kiva has full confidence in the Field Partner's ability to dutifully administer and collect your loan. Kiva will continue to monitor this Field Partner to adjust this rating over time. We recommend lending via a "5-Star" Field Partner if there is a unique connection to the entrepreneur and very low tolerance for repayment uncertainty.









  101. Field Partner Staff:
    loren ipsum...
  102. Field Partner Website:
    Field Partner's website, if available.
  103. Field Partner loan disbursals:
    We allow our Field Partners to disburse Kiva loans up to 30 days before the loan request is available for funding on Kiva. We do this because we don't want entrepreneurs to wait too long for the money they may need quickly.

    Our Field Partners may choose to fund the loan request from their existing funds, and then backfill that amount, if the loan is funded on Kiva (Kiva Field Partners can only receive 30% of their funding from Kiva - the rest must be from other sources). In doing so, the Field Partner is hoping that the loan does get funded on Kiva, because if it does not, they have to pay for the loan out of their own reserves.

    We list the date that the loan was disbursed on each entrepreneur's loan request page, in the "About the Loan" section, next to "Date Disbursed." You can also see the date that the loan request was listed on Kiva next to "Date Listed." For more information, please visit our Help Center
  104. First Repayment Date:
    Enter the date on which the first repayment is scheduled to be made. For pre-disbursed loans, this date may have already passed.
  105. Fundraising Status:
    Kiva adjusts the Fundraising Status of each Field Partner based on time on system and performance. Combined with the Field Partner Risk Rating, the Fundraising Status determines the number of loans a Field Partner can post in a given month. Kiva Field Partners can be




    • Pilot: Partners who just started working with us (they are allowed to raise funds on a limited basis -- they are changed to Active status after Kiva conducts a "pilot consultation")


    • Active: Partners who have gone through a pilot consultation and are currently raising funds on Kiva


    • Paused: The partner is temporarily unable to raise funds on Kiva due to either partner or Kiva request (if per Kiva request, paused status is triggered by exceeding the acceptable Total Fundraising Ratio on Kiva, or violation of policies)


    • Closed: Kiva no longer works with the partner


  106. GDP per capita (PPP):
    Gross domestic product (GDP) is the value of all final goods and services produced within the nation in a given year.
  107. Going, going, gone!:
    Great news! Loans are funding so fast that we’re close to running out. While this is great news for borrowers, we know you came here to lend. We’re working hard to get more loans posted.
  108. Group Client ID:
    Enter the identifier assigned to the group in the MFI's internal records. Entering this now will help you locate the group later in the Kiva system.
  109. Group ID:
    Enter the unique number or code used internally by your organization to identify a group (optional).
  110. Group Loan ID:
    Enter the unique identifier assigned to this loan in the MFI's internal records. This is required in order to report repayments on this loan.
  111. Group Name:
    If the group does not already have a name, you may leave this field blank or choose a name that reflects the character of the group.
  112. HTML Cheat Sheet for Writing Journals:
    text : Use this to surround bolded text

    link text : Link to another url
  113. How are the number of team loans calculated:
    There are two ways:

    1. Per team member
    2. Across all team members.

    The former is used almost everywhere, and the latter is used only on the Team Loans page.
  114. How can I print out the Gift Certificates I purchased?:
    Your Gift Certificates are available for reprinting anytime before the gift has been redeemed. Just log in to your Portfolio, scroll down to Gift Certificates, and click on the link "Print" beside the Gift Code. You will then be able to print the certificate on your printer. When the gift has been redeemed the name of the account which the gift was redeemed to will appear beside the gift code.
  115. How can I send Lender Messages?:
    Currently, you can only send a Lender Message from a public Lender Page by clicking on the Send Message button. You can also reply to a message you've received by using the 'Reply' button in My Portfolio -> My Messages --> Received.
  116. How do I add loans to my lending team?:
    Whenever you lend, you have the opportunity to count that loan toward one of your lending teams. You can count a loan toward a lending team of your choosing by following these

    Steps:



    Step 1: Click on the "Lend" button at the top of the Kiva home page. You will automatically be taken to the entrepreneurs in need.


    Step 2: When you find an entrepreneur that you would like to fund either click "Lend $25" to quickly lend $25, or click the name of the entrepreneur and then select the amount you would like to fund from the drop down box and click "Lend".


    Step 3: Add additional loans to your basket or click "Loan Added! Checkout."


    Step 4: You'll be taken to your basket where you can select what lending team your loans should count towards. Beneath the "Count Towards Team" column, you'll see a drop down box with your favorite lending team's name listed. Click that box and select the lending team you wish the loan to count towards. If you want to change the amount you wish to lend, select the amount in the drop down menu. When you're finished, click "Continue."


    Step 5: Choose a password to create an account, or log into your Kiva account.


    Step 6: Make an optional donation to Kiva's operational expenses or click "No Thanks."


    Step 7: You will be automatically transferred to PayPal to pay for the loan through PayPal's secure website.
  117. How do I become the captain of a lending team?:
    There are two ways to become the captain of a lending team:

    First, you can create a new lending team. Whenever you create a lending team, you are automatically made its captain.

    Or you can be made the captain of an existing lending team. In order to do this, one of the current team captains has to give you captainhood.

    As the captain of a lending team, it is your responsibility to make a good faith effort to remain involved in your team. This includes considering requests to join your team, reading messages posted to the team message board, and responding to lender messages sent to you by members of your team.

    In the event that a team captain fails in these responsibilities, a team member may contact Kiva customer service and request to be appointed as an additional team captain. In these circumstances, Kiva customer service will reach out to the original team captain. If the original captain cannot be contacted, an additional team captain will be appointed at the discretion of customer service.
  118. How do I create a lending team for my company?:
    You can create a lending team for your company by following these

    Steps:


    Step 1: Go to Kiva (http://www.kiva.org) and click "Community"


    Step 2: Click the "Start a New Team" button on the top left side of the page.


    Step 3: You'll be taken to the "Edit Team" screen where you can fill out the details of your team.



    • First, choose a name for your team -- usually your company's name - and enter it in the "Team Name" field.

    • Then, click the drop down box next to "Category" and select the category that you think best fits your team. For most companies, "Businesses" will fit. However, if you are creating a lending team for a group within your company, you should select "Businesses -- Internal Groups".

    • You can upload a photo, if you would like. Most companies use their logo as their lending team's photo. If you would like to upload a photo, click the "Browse" button and locate the photo on your computer. Click "Open" to upload the photo.

    • The "We Loan Because" and "How Would You Describe Your Team?" sections allow you to explain a little bit about your company and why you chose to lend with Kiva.

    • You can enter where your company or division is headquarted in "Location" and you can provide your company's website under "Lending Team Website".

    • Finally, you'll have to indicate whether or not you'd like the team to be open to all Kiva lenders, or if it should be closed -- and members can only be added by your approval. When you're finished, click "Save Team".





    Step 4: You'll be given the chance to recruit team members on the next page, or you can continue without inviting by clicking "Skip this Step". Once you're finished with this

    Step, you'll be taken to your company's lending team page.
  119. How do I create a lending team for my special event?:
    You can create a lending team for your special event by following these

    Steps:


    Step 1: Go to Kiva (http://www.kiva.org) and click "Community"


    Step 2: Click the "Start a New Team" button on the top left side of the page.


    Step 3: You'll be taken to the "Edit Team" screen where you can fill out the details of your team.



    • First, choose a name for your team and enter it in the "Team Name" field.

    • Then, click the drop down box next to "Category" and select the category that you think best fits your team.

    • You can upload a photo, if you would like. If you would like to upload a photo, click the "Browse" button and locate the photo on your computer. Click "Open" to upload the photo.

    • The "We Loan Because" and "How Would You Describe Your Team?" sections allow you to explain a little bit about your event and why you chose to lend with Kiva.

    • You can enter where event will take place in "Location" and if there is a website for your event, you can enter it in "Lending Team Website".

    • Finally, you'll have to indicate whether or not you'd like the team to be open to all Kiva lenders, or if it should be closed -- and members can only be added by your approval. When you're finished, click "Save Team".





    Step 4: You'll be given the chance to recruit team members on the next page, or you can continue without inviting by clicking "Skip this Step" (you can always invite members later). Once you're finished with this step, you'll be taken to your company's lending team page.
  120. How do I create a lending team?:


    Step 1: Log into your Kiva account and click "Community"


    Step 2: Click the "Start a New Team" button on the top left side of the page.


    Step 3: You'll be taken to the "Edit Team" screen. First, choose a name for your team and enter it in the "Team Name" field. Then, click the drop down box next to "Category" and select the category that you think best fits your team. If you would like to upload a photo, click the "Browse" button and locate the photo on your computer. Click "Open" to upload the photo. Complete the rest of the required fields and indicate whether or not you'd like the team to be open to all Kiva lenders, or if it should be closed -- and members can only be added by your approval. When you're finished, click "Save Team".


    Step 4: You'll be given the chance to recruit team members on the next page, or you can continue without inviting by clicking "Skip this

    Step". Once you're finished with this

    Step, you'll be taken to your Lending Team's page.
  121. How do I find a lending team?:
    You can search for a lending team by following these

    Steps:



    Step 1: Go to http://www.kiva.org and click "Community".


    Step 2: Enter your search criteria in the field next to "Search for a lending team" and click "Search".


    Step 3: You'll see a list of teams that best match your search. If the team you're interested in is open to all Kiva lenders, click "Join Team" to join. If the team is locked, click "Request to Join".


    Step 4: Log in to or create a Kiva account.
  122. How do I join a lending team?:
    You can join a public lending team by following these

    Steps:



    Step 1: Go to http://www.kiva.org and click "Community".


    Step 2: Enter your search criteria in the field next to "Search for a lending team" and click "Search".


    Step 3: You'll see a list of teams that best match your search. If the team you're interested in is open to all Kiva lenders, click "Join Team" to join. If the team is locked, click "Request to Join".


    Step 4: Log in to or create a Kiva account.
  123. How do I make someone else the captain of my lending team?:
    If you don't wish to be the captain of one of your lending teams, you can give captainhood of the team to someone else by following these

    Steps:



    Step 1: Go to http://www.kiva.org and click "Login" at the top of the page to log into your Kiva account.


    Step 2: Click "My Portfolio" and then "My Teams".


    Step 3: Click on the name of the team you wish to quit and then click "Edit Members".


    Step 4: You'll need to identify a new team captain and then, next to that person's name, click "Bestow Captainhood". The person you identified will now be your co-captain. If you would like to leave the group, you can either ask the new captain to remove you from the group, or remove your captainhood so that you can quit the team on your own terms.
  124. How do I quit a lending team?:
    If you don't wish to participate with a particular lending team anymore, you can choose to quit the team by following these

    Steps:



    Step 1: Go to http://www.kiva.org and click "Login" at the top of the page to log into your Kiva account.


    Step 2: Click "My Portfolio" and then "My Teams".


    Step 3: You'll see a listing of all of the lending teams that you are a member of. Find the team you would like to leave and click "Quit Team".
  125. How do I recruit people to my lending team?:
    You can invite people to a lending team that you are a member of -- even if you are not the team captain -- by following these

    Steps:



    Step 1: Go to http://www.kiva.org and click "Login" at the top of the page to log into your Kiva account.


    Step 2: Click "My Portfolio" and then "My Teams".


    Step 3: You'll see a listing of all of the lending teams that you are a member of. Find the team you would like to invite people to and click "Recruit Friends"


    Step 4: On the "Recruit Team Members" screen, enter the email addresses you would like to send the invitation to, and separate each one with a comma, or use the address book upload feature by clicking"Add emails from your address book, then decide whom to invite". If you would like, you can edit the message in the second box. Click "Send Invite" to continue.


    Step 5: If any of your invitees accept, you will see them appear on the "Members" section of your lending team.
  126. How do I set my preferred team?:
    You can set your preferred team by following these

    Steps:


    Step 1: Go to http://www.kiva.org and click "Login" at the top of the page to log into your Kiva account.


    Step 2: Click "My Portfolio" and then "My Teams".


    Step 3: You'll see a listing of all of the lending teams that you are a member of. There is a drop down box above you listed teams and to the right that says "Preferred Team". Select a team from the drop down box to set your preferred team.
  127. How do I use my Gift Certificate to make a loan?:

    1. Click on Kiva Gifts at the top of this page.

    2. Under "Gift Certificates" click "Redeem".


    3. If you already have a Kiva Account, click "Login Now" at the top of the page, then enter the Gift Code and Email of Purchaser which appear on the left of your Gift Certificate (under the Kiva logo). Click Redeem Gift Certificate.


      If you are a new Kiva User, enter the Gift Code and Email of Purchaser which appear on the left of your Gift Certificate (under the Kiva logo). Then enter your details, including a password, to create a Kiva Account. Click Sign Up.



    4. Your Gift Certificate has now been redeemed, and the value of your gift is available as a credit balance in your account. To make a loan, click on LEND to browse the loans in need of funding.


    5. When you are ready to check out, click on "Pay with Kiva credit" at the bottom of your basket page. Note: if your checkout total is greater than your credit balance, you will not see this button and will be asked to make a payment through PayPal.


  128. How do Lending Teams work?:
    Members of Kiva Lending Teams continue lending as individuals, but they have the option to count each loan they make towards the overall impact of one of their teams.
  129. How do repayments work?:
    Kiva's repayment system is designed to accurately reflect the way that our Field Partners collect funds from the entrepreneurs that you've supported with loans.



    When one of Kiva's Field Partners uploads an entrepreneur's loan request to Kiva, they set the anticipated repayment dates for the loan and the date that the loan is set to be disbursed to the entrepreneur. This repayment schedule can be monthly, once at the end of the loan term, or whatever most accurately reflects the way that the entrepreneur will be making repayments.



    Our Field Partners have until the end of the month that each anticipated repayment is due to let Kiva know whether or not they actually collected the repayment. Once we have all of this information, we use it to generate a bill to charge our Field Partners for all of the repayments they collected that month.



    To speed things up and to minimize the number of wire transfers being sent overseas, Kiva works on a net billing system. This means that, for any given month, we subtract the amount of repayments that a Field Partner owes to Kiva lenders from the amount that a Field Partner fundraises for entrepreneurs on Kiva.



    If the balance is positive, that means that the Field Partner has raised more than they need to repay, and we use those funds to credit your lender account with the repayments due to you.



    If the balance is negative, then the Field Partner has to send us a payment for the balance. As soon as we receive that payment, we use those funds to credit your lender account with the repayments due to you.



    Once the repayment is made into your Kiva account, you can re-lend the funds, donate them to Kiva's operating expenses, purchase a gift certificate or withdraw them into a PayPal account.



    Currency Conversion

    While Kiva loans are often made to entrepreneurs in local currency denominations, all transfers of money between Kiva and the Field Partner are conducted in US Dollars.


    For loans in which currency exchange loss is possible (information which you can find under the "About the Loan" section on the Entrepreneur's profile page), there is a chance that the lender will take a loss on the repayment if the US Dollar appreciates by more than 10% against the local currency. When such a loss occurs, the amount lost is listed in the Advanced view of the schedule, along with a link to learn more about the details of the loss.


    For more on Currency Exchange Loss, visit Kiva's Help Center.
  130. How is this calculated?:
    The total amount available to fundraise for the month, or (month) Fundraising Capacity, is calculated as follows:



    Monthly Fundraising Limit + Amount fundraising as of (last day of previous month) = (month) Fundraising Capacity



    The amount still available to fund in the month, or Outstanding Fundraising Capacity is calculated as follows:


    (month) Fundraising Capacity - Loans Raised - Loans Fundraising - Loans Refunded and Expired = Outstanding Fundraising Capacity


    Loans Refunded and Expired: loans that were published to kiva.org before the current month and refunded this month, plus loans that expired this month
  131. I didn't receive an email with my Gift Code:
    Please check your spam or bulk folders - it is possible that your email service provider thought that your Kiva.org email was spam. In any case, you can get your Gift Codes immediately by logging in to your Portfolio and scrolling down to Gift Certificates - you can also print your certificates from here too!
  132. I'm a member of more than one lending team. How do I pick which team my loan counts towards?:
    Whenever you lend, you have the opportunity to count that loan toward one of your lending teams. You can count a loan toward a lending team of your choosing by following these

    Steps:



    Step 1: Click on the "Lend" button at the top of the Kiva home page. You will automatically be taken to the entrepreneurs in need.


    Step 2: When you find an entrepreneur that you would like to fund either click "Lend $25" to quickly lend $25, or click the name of the entrepreneur and then select the amount you would like to fund from the drop down box and click "Lend".


    Step 3: Add additional loans to your basket or click "Loan Added! Checkout."


    Step 4: You'll be taken to your basket where you can select what lending team your loans should count towards. Beneath the "Count Towards Team" column, you'll see a drop down box with your favorite lending team's name listed. Click that box and select the lending team you wish the loan to count towards. If you want to change the amount you wish to lend, select the amount in the drop down menu. When you're finished, click "Continue."


    Step 5: Choose a password to create an account, or log into your Kiva account.


    Step 6: Make an optional donation to Kiva's operational expenses or click "No Thanks."


    Step 7: You will be automatically transferred to PayPal to pay for the loan through PayPal's secure website.
  133. I'm already connected. Why are you asking again?:
    We need additional permissions for Facebook features such as publishing repayments, and delivering Kiva Cards via Wall posts. We will not share your account information with Facebook or attempt to contact your Facebook friends, except to deliver Kiva Cards.
  134. If your MFI has been approved to mark no repayment exceptions for the current period:
    Kiva requires that you report all repayments that were either ahead of or behind the schedule you entered into Kiva when you posted the borrower profile. If no loan repayments for this period differ from the expected schedule, use the section below.
  135. Image:
    If this is an individual loan, show a picture (.gif or .jpg) of your
    borrower at their place of work. If this is a
    group, post a picture of the entire group. Remember for group loans
    you can only raise funds in the group loan for those borrowers
    who are in the picture.
  136. Individual Client ID:
    If the MFI tracks the individual clients within the loan, enter the Client ID for each entrepreneur here as well. This will allow you to easily find the group in the Kiva system.
  137. Individual Loan ID:
    If the MFI does not have a Group Loan ID, but rather individual Loan IDs for all members of the group, enter those Individual Loan IDs here.
  138. Infant Mortality Rate (per 1000):
    Rate of death per 1000 infants in the first year of life. The leading causes of infant mortality are dehydration and disease.
  139. Innovation:

    These Field Partners embrace technology and innovation to better address the needs of the people they serve.


  140. Interest:
    Amount earned on the loan. Fields below represent each interest payment over the course of the loan, based on the specified loan parameters. This amount is not payable to Kiva.
  141. Interest Rate Calculation:
    Select the checkbox if appropriate. If this loan is calculated using a declining balance interest rate (sometimes known as a "simple interest rate"), you must also enter a value in the ANNUALIZED INTEREST RATE field in order to correctly calculate the repayment schedule.
  142. Interest Rate Type:
    Select the appropriate Interest Rate Type.
  143. Invoicing Status:
    The Invoicing Status reflects the freshness of the preliminary statement data and repayment statistics. Every time a repayment is reported or a csv is uploaded, the repayment statistics are re-calculated.

    "dirty" - new data has been uploaded, but calculation of new stats has not begun

    "in-progress" - calculation of new stats has begun

    "up-to-date" - the statistics displayed on the site are up to date with respect to the repayment data that has been uploaded.
  144. Journal Frequency (Average Per Loan Per Year):
    An annualized estimation of the number of journals based on historical journaling rates.
    This figure helps lenders understand the relative frequency of updates.
  145. Journaling Rate:
    The percentage of ended loans that have at least one journal.
  146. Journaling Rate For Current Month:
    The percentage of loans ended this month that have at least one journal.
  147. Kiva Entrepreneurs:
    Total number of entrepreneurs posted by this Field Partner that have raised loans on Kiva. This number includes individual entrepreneurs within this partner's group loans.
  148. Kiva Fundraising Notes:
    Additional notes provided by Kiva Staff regarding this field partner's fundraising status.
  149. Kiva Round-Up:
    This is the value in local currency that the payment is rounded up to in order for it to convert neatly into a $25 increment in USD
  150. Labor Force:
    The country's suppliers of labor grouped by specific occupation.
    The labor force consists of everyone of working age (typically above a certain age (around 14 to 16) and below retirement (around 65) who
    are participating workers, that is people actively employed or seeking employment. People not counted include students,
    retired people, stay-at-home parents,
    people in prisons or similar institutions, as well as discouraged workers who simply do not want work.



    Occupational sectors featured in Labor Force categorization may include:


    • Agriculture: the process of producing food, feed, fiber, fuel and other goods by the systematic raising of plants and animals.

    • Industry: is the segment of economy concerned with the manufacturing and production of goods.

    • Services: sector of an economy made up of people or businesses providing personal and professional services to others.


  151. Language of Description:
    Choose the language the profile is written in.
  152. Last Reported Repayment:
    This represents cumulative (or total) repayments made on this loan to date.
  153. Lenders Repaid:
    This status is the frequency with which repayments will be made into your Kiva account. It can be any of the following:


    Monthly - One repayment made per month

    At end of term - One repayment made at the end of the loan term

    Irregularly - Any other repayment schedule
  154. Life Expectancy:
    Average length of survival for members of country's population.
  155. Literacy Rate:
    Percentage of the population with the ability to read and write.
  156. Loan ID:
    Enter the unique identifier assigned to this loan in the Field Partner's internal records. This is required in order to report repayments on this loan.
  157. Loan Product:
    Please choose the correct loan product for this loan from the options provided. If there is no loan product option that fits this loan, contact your Kiva Partnership Manager.
  158. Loan Term:
    This is the number of months in which you expect this loan to be
    repaid. If not repaid by the end of this month, then the loan will be
    considered delinquent. For group loans, use the longest loan term of
    all the loans to individuals in the group.
  159. Loan Type:
    Select whether the loan is for an individual or a group of people.
  160. Loan Use:
    Be as descriptive as possible to explain to the lender exactly how the borrower will use the loan (or, if a group, how the group leader will
    use his or her loan). If you can, quote prices for items the
    borrower plans to buy. Avoid general descriptions such as
    'to expand the business'. Remember, the lender likes to know as much
    as possible about how the borrower plans to invest the loan.
  161. Loan Use - This borrower will use this loan: (for example, "to pay for..."):
    Begin the sentence with an infinitive (for example, "to purchase","to build", "to resell") to correctly complete the sentence "This borrower will use this loan...". For example, "To buy new beauty supplies to increase the number of customers at her salon." In this case, if the loan use is "to buy new beauty supplies to increase the number of customers at her salon." the first half of the loan use says what the borrower will purchase and the second half refers to the borrower's business (if applicable) and how the loan will help the borrower.

    The loan use is the one of the first things a lender sees when browsing loans on www.kiva.org and an important factor in deciding which loan to fund. A loan use that just says “to expand the business” or “to increase inventory” does not provide enough detail.


  162. Loans To Women Borrowers:
    Percentage of total loans that go to women entrepreneurs.
  163. Loans at Risk (PAR 1):
    The percentage of Paying Back Loans at risk, with loan principal past due in repayment. This percentage is exposed to lenders on the Kiva site.

    How this is calculated: Loans at Risk Rate = Remaining amount of principal of paying back loans that are delinquent / Total outstanding principal balance the Field Partner has with Kiva.
  164. Location:
    Choose the location of the town or city where the borrower or featured borrower lives and/or works.
  165. Mix Profile:
    The Microfinance Information Exchange (MIX) Market is the standard microfinance industry database on microfinance institutions.
    Many of our Field Partners make their performance more transparent by posting their profile on the MIX Market.
    Kiva strongly encourages each Field Partner to participate in the MIX.
  166. Net Balance For:
    Kiva's net billing process is done on a monthly basis. The Net Balance category includes funds raised, repayments collected, and refunds issued last month.
  167. Network Affiliation:
    Field Partners typically are supported by Microfinance Networks, which help provide funds, technical advice and best
    practice information to its member. Microfinance Networks play a critical role in building capacity for Kiva Field Partners.
    We encourage Kiva users to learn more about these Microfinance Networks.
  168. Not Yet Reported:
    This represents the number of loans of which repayment data has yet to be reported from your MFI's Management Information System and/or has not been reported manually. To ensure loan repayment data is accurate for your MFI, please upload or manually mark repayment data for these loans before the repayment reporting deadline.
  169. Number Of Ended Loans:
    Total number of loans raised and disbursed which are no longer in the process of being paid back by an entrepreneur.
  170. Number Of Ended Loans Defaulted:
    Number of Ended Loans which are not repaid in full.
  171. Number Of Paying Back Loans:
    Total number of loans raised and disbursed which are in the process of being paid back by an entrepreneur.
  172. Number Of Paying Back Loans 1 Day Late:
    Defn
  173. Number Of Paying Back Loans 1 Month Late:
    Defn
  174. Number Of Raised Inactive Loans:
    Total number of loans raised but not yet disbursed to the intended entrepreneur.
  175. Number Of Refunded Loans:
    Total number of loans refunded to lenders due to an error. See Amount of Refunded Loans for error possibilities and handling.
  176. Number of Group Members:
    Select the total number of individuals within the group receiving the loan.
  177. Number of Installments:
    Enter the number of repayment installments.
  178. Number of Loans Delinquent:
    Number of Paying Back Loans with one or more repayments past due.
  179. Official Language:
    Language(s) given a unique legal status in the country and typically the language used in a nation's legislative bodies.
  180. Overall Journaling Rate:
    The percentage of ended loans that have at least one journal.
  181. Overdue Balance Due:
    Kiva uses a net billing process in which newly raised funds are netted against repayments collected from borrowers. When partners owe Kiva funds, they must be paid no later than 15 days from the day that the final statement is released announcing the amount due. Funds not paid on time become overdue and are listed in the Overdue Balance category.
  182. Owed to Kiva:
    This is the amount your MFI owes to Kiva after subtracting the currency loss absorbed by Kiva lenders
  183. Par 1:
    Defn
  184. Par 30:
    Defn
  185. Partner Email Contact:
    If you have a question about this Field Partner, we encourage you to email them and ask.
  186. Paying Back Loans 1 Day Late:
    Defn
  187. Paying Back Loans 1 Month Late:
    Defn
  188. Paying Back Loans Delinquent:
    Percentage of Paying Back Loans which are late in repayment.
    Note that a "delinquent" loan (1 or more repayments late) is not the same as a "defaulted" loan
    (no hope of recovering the amount still due). However, it is an important indicator of principal
    risk on Kiva (since it's a relatively new service) because it provides early insight into the potential long term "Default Rate".




    How this is calculated:



    Amount of Paying Back Loans Delinquent
    /
    Amount of Paying Back Loans


  189. Population:
    Total number of persons inhabiting the country
  190. Population Below Poverty Line:
    The percentage of the population living below the poverty line - i.e., the minimum level of income deemed necessary to achieve an adequate standard of living.
  191. Portfolio Yield:

    Kiva uses a calculation called "portfolio yield" to express the average interest rate and fees that Kiva borrowers pay to the Kiva Field Partner administering their loan. Portfolio yield is defined as all interest and fees paid by entrepreneurs to the Field Partner divided by the average portfolio outstanding during any given year.


    The Portfolio Yield is generally based on audited financial information and is a better indication of the cost of borrowing money from a Kiva Field Partner than the simple interest rates reported by our Field Partners because it:



    1. Includes any fees associated with loans and

    2. Is expressed in one-year increments (similar to the way an APR works)


    Please note that Portfolio Yield does not yet include the concept of mandatory savings.


    For more information about portfolio yield and interest rates, please visit the Kiva Help Center and click "Interest Rates/Portfolio Yield".


  192. Portfolio Yield Notes:
    Additional notes provided by Kiva staff regarding this field partner's portfolio yield
  193. Preliminary Statement:
    This is an unofficial statement displaying what your statement were to look like if the statement period end date were today. The preliminary statement is updated nightly, meaning that repayments reported as of yesterday will be displayed here.



    Final statements for a month are issued on the 15th of the following month.
  194. Primary Activity:
    Choose a Primary Activity that represents as accurately as possible the borrower's business.
  195. Primary Sector:
    Choose an activity that groups this loan use
    with other similar activities, such as 'carpentry', 'farming',
    'handicrafts' or 'grocery store'. Use the sector filter to narrow the range of choices.
  196. Primary Sector:
    Choose a Primary Activity that represents as accurately as possible the borrower's business.
  197. Primary Sector:
    Choose an activity that groups this loan use
    with other similar activities, such as 'carpentry', 'farming',
    'handicrafts' or 'grocery store'. Use the sector filter to narrow the range of choices.
  198. Principal:
    The original amount of a debt or investment on which interest is calculated. Fields below represent each repayment on principal over the course of the loan, based on the specified loan parameters.
  199. Profitability (Return on Assets):
    Return on Assets is an indication of a microfinance institution's profitability. It can also be an indicator of the long-term sustainability of a microfinance institution, as organizations consistently operating at a loss (those that have a negative return on assets) may not be able to sustain their operations over time.
  200. Refund Rate:
    Percentage of Total Loans that have been refunded due to an error. Errors vary from the unintentional (e.g. Field Partner accidentally uploaded a duplicate Entrepreneur profile which received funding and recognized it later) to more serious issues (e.g. a Kiva audit discovered that loan funds were used inappropriately). In the latter case, Kiva will attempt to refund lenders with any funds recovered. In all cases, information about why the refund was issued is published on each loan listing page.



    How this is calculated:


    Amount of Refunded Loans / Total Loans
  201. Repayment Due Dates:
    Repayment Due Dates are the dates after which a loan will be considered delinquent if the repayment has not been received.



    A number of steps need to take place before repayments made by entrepreneurs are received by Kiva lenders. First, repayments are made by entrepreneurs to our Field Partners. Then, Field Partner staff members enter the repayment into the Kiva system. Kiva collects the funds from the Field Partner either by reducing the owed amount from their next loan funds payment, or by receiving a bank wire from the Field Partner. Finally, when the payment has cleared into Kiva's account, the repayment is reported to lenders.



    Due Dates take into account the processes detailed above which must take place before a repayment is reported. In most cases, repayments will be received and reported to lenders before the Due Dates pass.



    To learn more about different repayment terms, click here to visit Kiva's Help Center.
  202. Repayment Schedule:
    To enter a Repayment Schedule, upload a CSV (comma-separated values) file of this loan's parameters by clicking the "Upload CSV File" button OR enter the loan parameters manually by pressing the "Specify Parameters" button. Based on the information uploaded or entered manually, the Kiva system will generate a repayment schedule for the loan, including principal by installment. You should check the schedule to make sure it is correct. You can modify the Kiva-generated repayment schedule as needed.
  203. Repayment Term:
    This is the number of months it takes from the point that the loan is disbursed to the entrepreneur to the point when the last repayment will be paid into your Kiva account.
  204. Repayment in Local Currency:
    This is either the amount reported by the MFI, or the amount expected by the Kiva system.
  205. Repayment in USD:
    This is the amount in dollars that should have been repaid assuming no currency protection
  206. Repayments:
    This column lists all repayments for this loan as reported by your MFI or, in the case where there are no repayments reported and your MFI has chosen to cover borrower underpayment, as according to the expected schedule entered at time of posting the business.
  207. Repayments to be Invoiced:
    For any single loan, Kiva can not invoice a partner for less than was invoiced in a previous period. If the expected repayment for this period is less than a previously invoiced repayment for a loan, then Kiva will invoice you at least the amount of the previously invoiced repayment.
  208. Repayments to be Invoiced (Currency As Reported):
    The value of loan repayments reported or not yet reported in the currency the loans were posted in. If you post loans to Kiva using more than one currency, loan repayment values will be displayed in multiple currencies here.
  209. Show Graph:
    This shows the journaling rate over time, from the selected Period up to the current month. To see meaningful data, select a Period in the past.
  210. Show on Kiva:
    Uncheck the box if this information should NOT appear on the Kiva website for privacy, security, or other reasons.
  211. Social Performance:

    At Kiva, we want to create good in the world. A lot of good.


    One way that we try to maximize the good created through Kiva is by partnering with organizations that go above and beyond to generate positive outcomes for the communities they serve. This is called social performance.


    Different organizations have different social performance strengths. The Kiva Social Performance Badges below were created to recognize organizations with a demonstrated commitment to one or more of these areas.


    The badges were developed through careful research into best practices across the microfinance industry, and what Kiva has learned about facilitating positive outcomes for borrowers. These badges are assigned to Kiva Field Partners during an initial due diligence process and are updated annually.


    We know that every member of the Kiva community wants to maximize the impact they have when making a loan. When choosing a borrower to lend to on Kiva, we invite you to consider the Field Partner’s social performance strengths.


    See more details about Social Performance Strengths >>
  212. Social Performance Reporting Level:
    The level of social performance disclosure from the Field Partner, based on CGAP's Social Performance Reporting Awards.
  213. Spanish:
    Uncheck this box to return to the English version of our web site
  214. Spread the word about this loan on Facebook!:
    The feature allows you to post your comment to your Facebook page. Just connect your Kiva account to Facebook and permit Kiva to post to your page when you choose.


  215. Start Date On Kiva:
    Date at which the first business was posted on Kiva.org for this partner and all partners
    (i.e. date at which Kiva's first business was listed publicly).
  216. Successfully Reported:
    This represents the number of loans that were uploaded successfully from your MFI's Management Information System file or that were successfully entered manually into the Kiva system. You do not need to provide additional repayment information about these loans until the next repayment reporting deadline.
  217. Time On Kiva:
    Number of months since the Field Partner first posted a loan on Kiva.org.
  218. Total:
    This represents the total loans that your MFI is repaying to Kiva lenders at this time, both successfully reported and not yet reported. Your organization will be invoiced for these repayment amounts for the current statement period.
  219. Total Amount Due By:
    The Total Amount due by the end of the month is the sum of the Overdue Balance and the Net Balance for the previous month less the Wires Received this month (after application to the Overdue Balance).
  220. Total Amount Lent:
    The cumulative amount of funds applied to Kiva loans in a lender's portfolio.
  221. Total Amount Lost:
    Total amount of loans not repaid due to either loan default or currency exchange loss.
  222. Total Amount Refunded and Expired:
    The value of all refunds issued by Kiva (due to errors, fraud or expiration).
  223. Total Amount Repaid:
    The value of all repayments made on loans.
  224. Total Journals:
    The total number of journals (loan updates) posted on Kiva's website.
    Journals are a way for lenders to follow the impact of their loan.
  225. Total Kiva Loans Raised:
    The cumulative amount of loans this partner has raised through the Kiva website.
  226. Total Loans:
    Total loans indicate the total amount of loans this organization has raised through the Kiva website. This excludes refunded loans.
  227. Updated Nightly:
    Kiva receives a feed of daily exchange rates at midnight every day from www.xe.com.
  228. Vulnerable Group Focus:

    These Field Partners provide financial services to people from especially vulnerable and socially marginalized populations and groups.


  229. What are Lender Messages?:
    Lender Messages let one lender write to another lender through the website. Lender Messages are a way for Kiva Lenders to build a stronger community for the purpose of alleviating poverty together.
  230. What does it mean that my loan is not reserved?:
    Unlike most loans on Kiva, loans that have less than 6 hours left to raise funds on Kiva are not reserved when added to your basket. This means that there is a chance that this loan may be funded by other lenders even though it is in your basket. To make this loan, please proceed through the checkout process.
  231. What is my preferred team?:
    Your preferred team is the team that, by default, your loans will be counted towards on the basket page. You are always free to select a different team or no team at all in your basket when checking out.
  232. Where do I read my Lender Messages?:
    You can read all of your Lender Messages on the My Portfolio -> My Messages page.
  233. Who can use Lender Messages?:
    Kiva Lenders with public Lender Pages who have made loans on the site can send Lender Messages. Lenders with public Lender Pages can receive Lender Messages. This helps us reduce the possibility of SPAM and unwanted messages.
  234. Why Kiva Works With This Field Partner:

    Making a loan on Kiva can be so simple that you may not realize how much work goes on behind the scenes. We think the Kiva team gets its fair share of attention, but our Field Partners can be overlooked. Kiva has over 125 diverse Field Partners in 57 countries who deliver microfinance services directly to the borrowers you see on Kiva. These services include a variety of financial products, such as microloans and savings, and other essential non-financial services, such as training and empowerment programs.

    Perhaps our Field Partners’ most critical role in the Kiva ecosystem is to find and evaluate each and every borrower you find on Kiva. These unsung heroes help us to achieve our mission by posting loans to Kiva and handling collections and journal updates. Without these Field Partners, Kiva would not be the global agent of change that it is today.

    As a measure of our commitment to transparency, Kiva is sharing the reason why we chose to work with each of our Field Partners.

    Because we believe that reaching the excluded through innovative offerings is critical to alleviating global poverty, we strive to work with Field Partners who are defined by their:

    • Strong social mission;
    • Financial and operational strength;
    • Demonstrated ability to reach their target clients;
    • Delivery of high quality and appropriate financial and non-financial services;
    • Commitment to excellent do-no-harm client protection principles.

    We should note also that, while working in some of the most challenging locations in the world, Kiva Field Partners are often held to higher standards of conduct and performance than many banks in the developed world!

    Generally, Kiva chooses to work with Field Partners who facilitate one of the following:

    1. Push the frontier of financial access
    2. Create or expand a good thing
    3. Reward a good thing
    4. Catalyze change for the future

  235. Why is the entrepreneur listed as anonymous?:

    Kiva has Field Partners all over the world, and because we work with organizations in so many countries, Kiva needs to provide enough flexibility to allow our Field Partners to keep up our data-rich environment while still complying with local laws. To this end, Kiva allows its Field Partners to make private certain information regarding an entrepreneur’s name, likeness and location when a loan is at risk. This allows our Field Partners to comply with consumer protection laws in their communities, while still providing as much information as possible to Kiva lenders.


    If you are a lender to this entrepreneur (or group of entrepreneurs), you can see the full details of the loan by logging in.


  236. Will a physical card be mailed to me?:
    No. At this time we do not have physical cards to send in the mail. However, we do have a printable gift certificate which you can print and mail to your gift recipient.
  237. Will my Gift Certificate recipient be able to choose their own loans?:
    Yes, your Gift Certificate recipient will be able to choose their own loans. When they redeem their Gift (see number 1 above) they will be prompted to create their own Kiva Account, and the loans they choose will be associated with their account. No, they will not have access to your PayPal account or credit card. A Gift Certificate is not associated with the payment account or method used to purchase it, so your account details are secure.
  238. Wires Received After Application to Overdue Balance:
    After Kiva applies funds to cover the Overdue Balance, the remaining amount is included in this category. These remaining funds are used to reduce the amount owed this month or are added to funds due to the partner.
  239. Your Internal Group ID:
    If this is an individual loan and the borrower has an ID already
    assigned in the in the MFI's own records, enter it here. (optional) If
    this is a group loan and the group has an ID already assigned in the MFI's
    own records, enter it here (optional).