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Marlene Esperanza

Update on Marlene Esperanza

The María Auxiliadora Communal Bank meets every two weeks in La Sequita Parish in Montecristi, a canton known the famous straw [or "Panama"] hats that are valued both in Ecuador and abroad.

This is where Marlene lives. She's 49 years old and married, and she has four adult children from this relationship, only one of whom still lives in her house. Her husband works in construction.

Marlene is a very enterprising woman who likes to earn something to help her husband get ahead. She has a mini-pharmacy at her house. She sells all types of medicine in order to improve the health of her customers who come to her place day to day when they need medicine.

She also raises pigs and chickens. She gets good profits when she sells them, and this helps her improve her business more and more. She has had the pharmacy for almost two years. She stocks it more every day in order to improve her customer service.

She's going to use this loan to buy medicine to stock her pharmacy and to buy feed for chickens and pigs. She has been in the communal bank for more than 17 years, and she likes the earnings she receives from the institution.

Her dream is to improve her pharmacy.
View original language description ↓
El Grupo De Crédito María Auxiliadora se reúne cada quince días en La parroquia La Sequita de Montecristi, cantón conocido por los famosos sombreros de paja toquilla que son apreciados dentro y fuera del país.
En este lugar vive la señora Marlene, tiene 49 años de edad, está casada y de esta relación tiene 4 hijos mayores de edad pero uno de ellos aun vive con ellos. Su esposo se dedica a la albañilería.
Doña Marlene es una mujer muy emprendedora que le gusta ganar algo para ayudarle a su marido a salir adelante, ella tiene y mini farmacia en su casa donde vende toda clase de medicamentos para mejorar la salud de sus clientes que a diario llegan hasta su local cuando necesitan de medicinas, ella también se dedica a la cría de chanchos y pollos los mismos que al venderlos le dejan buenos ingresos que le sirven para ir mejorando su negocio cada vez más, lleva casi dos años con su farmacia y cada día la surte mas para mejorar el servicio para sus clientes.
Este crédito lo va a emplear en comprar medicinas para surtir su farmacia y alimento para pollos y chanchos. Lleva más de 17 años en el Grupo De Crédito y le gustan los beneficios que recibe de la institución. Sus sueños son mejorar su farmacia.

Previous Loan Details

María Auxiliadora Communal Bank meets every two weeks in La Sequita Parish in Montecristi, a canton known as the birthplace of Eloy Alfaro [José Eloy Alfaro (1842-1912), an Ecuadorian revolutionary leader and president] and for the famous straw [or "Panama"] hats that are valued both in Ecuador a... More from Marlene Esperanza's previous loan »

Additional Information

Concurrent and Successive Loans

Our Field Partners often work with borrowers over a series of loans as the borrowers build credit, take out bigger loans, and expand their businesses. In order to make it easier for our Field Partners to post loans for borrowers who have been listed on Kiva before, we allow them to post successive and concurrent loans for their Kiva borrowers. This means that our Field Partners are able to post a borrower's second, third, etc., loan on Kiva without having to re-enter all of the borrower's information.

This borrower has been listed on Kiva before, so you'll see an updated loan description, as well as excerpts of the original descriptions from earlier loans. Most borrowers take out loans consecutively, meaning that they receive a second loan after having repaid the first. However, sometimes our Field Partners give out concurrent loans, allowing borrowers to take out one primary loan and a secondary "add-on" loan along with it. These "add-on" loans are typically smaller than the borrower's primary loan and serve a different purpose. Because Field Partners can now post loans as successive and concurrent loans, you will be able to track borrower progress over time and see the various ways a borrower is working with our Field Partners through funds from Kiva’s lenders.

About Ecuador

  • $10,200
    Average annual income
  • 29
    View loans »
    Ecuador Loans Fundraising
  • $23,142,500
    Funds lent in using Kiva
  • US Dollars
    Loan transacted in USD

Success!! The loan was 100% repaid

A loan of $1,300 helped Marlene Esperanza to buy medicine to stock her pharmacy and to buy feed for chickens and pigs.
100% repaid
Repayment Term
7 months (Additional Information)
Repayment Schedule
Monthly
Pre-Disbursed:
Jun 30, 2014
Listed
Jul 28, 2014
Currency Exchange Loss:
N/A
Ended:
Dec 17, 2014