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Sili 2 Centre - Group 1
In this Group: Eseta, Lina, Petasa, Ruta, Sau, Silifu, Sulesa, Toaiga, Tofe
The village of Sili on Savaii Island is one of the well-endowed villages in terms of natural resources. It has very rich soil, with a large number of springs and creeks which serve as natural irrigation for farms located at the foot of the mountain ranges. Most of the households in Sili village farm taro, bananas and vegetables. They sell their products in the capital town of Salelologa, which is about 40 kilometers from the village. The village learned about SPBD through the radio talk-back shows and from a meeting SPBD staff made with a village chief. After the successful training of the first loan group in Sili village, more women became interested in the SPBD savings and loan program. The village chief has convened the village council, endorsed the SPBD program and encouraged women in the village to join. They are now thinking of putting up a string of stalls by the roadside so that women sell their produce to passersby as an alternative to going to the Salelologa market.

Sili 2 group will be using their loans for the following purposes:


Eseta L. (45, married, 2 children): purchase 2 bush knives, 2 knife filings (sharpeners), spades, workers to cultivate and sell taro, tuamu and bananas.

Lina I. (60, widow, 8 children): purchase a knife, spade, filing, 3 bush knives and other farming equipment to grow and sell taro, tuamu and yams.

P. Komisi (45, widow, 2 children): purchase a bush knife, filing, spade and other farming equipment to cultivate and sell popcorn, taro and yams.

Ruta T. (50, married, 6 children): purchase 2 knives, a pick, a filing, a rake and other farming equipment to grow and sell taro and bananas.

Sau T. (48, married, 4 children): purchase 5 bush knives, a weed killing sprayer and workers to grow and sell taro and yams.

Silifu T. (38, married, 2 children): purchase 3 bush knives, a spade, a filing and other farming equipment to grow and sell taro, bananas, and tuamu.

Sulesa I. (36, married, 1 child) purchase 2 knives, a filing, a wheel barrow, a spade and a weed killing sprayer to cultivate and sell taro and bananas.

Toaiga A. (43, married, 7 children) purchase a bush knife, filing, spade and other farming equipment to grow and sell taro and bananas.

Tofe A. (24, married, 2 children) purchase 2 knives, 2 filings, boots, a weed killing sprayer to cultivate and sell taro and bananas.

Additional Information

About SPBD

South Pacific Business Development (SPBD) improves conditions for families living in poverty by providing accessible credit, training, and guidance to help them start, grow and maintain micro-businesses, build assets, finance home improvements, and afford to educate their children. 99% of SPBD’s loans go to women, who can borrow in groups to guarantee one another rather than put up collateral.

This is a Group Loan

In a group loan, each member of the group receives an individual loan but is part of a larger group of individuals. The group is there to provide support to the members and to provide a system of peer pressure, but groups may or may not be formally bound by a group guarantee. In cases where there is a group guarantee, members of the group are responsible for paying back the loans of their fellow group members in the case of delinquency or default.

Kiva's Field Partners typically feature one borrower from a group. The loan description, sector, and other attributes for a group loan profile are determined by the featured borrower's loan. The other members of the group are not required to use their loans for the same purpose.

About Samoa

  • $6,344
    Average annual income
  • 35
    View loans »
    Samoa Loans Fundraising
  • $6,875,350
    Funds lent in using Kiva
  • 2.7
    Samoa Tala (WST) = $1 USD

Success!! The loan was 100% repaid

A portion of Sili 2 Centre - Group 1's $1,925 loan helped a member purchase of bush knives, spades, knife filings, etc….
100% repaid
Repayment Term
14 months (Additional Information)
Repayment Schedule
Monthly
Disbursed:
Apr 27, 2008
Listed
Apr 8, 2008
Currency Exchange Loss:
Covered
Ended:
Jun 20, 2009