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Khulafai Primary School Group
In this Group: Momodu , Marie , Hannah, Janet, Agnes, Abibatu, Alie M., Mohamed L., Hawanatu, John P., Abdul A.*, Sylvester K.*
* not pictured
These are some of the teachers of the Khulafai Primary School, located in Makeni, a town in Northern Sierra Leone. The school serves a total of 805 students (338 boys, 467 girls) and employs 23 teachers. In operation for 12 years, it receives a small annual stipend from the government to help cover its operating costs (very few schools in Sierra Leone are funded exclusively by the government). The school reports many successes, including the fact that the external (national) exam scores for their pupils have been steadily increasing thanks in large part to the teachers' hard work. For many of the teachers here, however, life can be a struggle. The school has fallen into disrepair, and there are no funds available to build additional classrooms, repair walls, replace broken desks, or make other necessary adjustments. Furthermore, many teachers' salaries are long overdue, with some that have waited over two years to receive a paycheck. Many teachers engage in side-projects and small businesses in order to supplement (or in some cases replace) their salaries, and Khulafai's teachers are collectively seeking a loan of SLL 11 million from SMT and Kiva Lenders.



Momodu K. (pictured second from right, back row) is a senior teacher at the school and has taken on the role of group leader. Momodu is 46 years old and has been teaching young children for 25 years. He is married to a petty trader, and together they have eight children (three boys and five girls). Five of Momodu's children attend school and three are not yet old enough. Some time ago, he purchased a plot of land on which he dreamed of building a house for his family because he believes that "once you own a home, you have something for which you and your family can be proud." He plans to use his portion of the funds to finance the purchase of some materials so that he can begin construction.

Additional Information

About Salone Microfinance Trust (SMT)

Salone Microfinance Trust (SMT) is Kiva’s oldest field partner in Sierra Leone. SMT began operations in 2002 as a microcredit program of the NGO Child Fund Sierra Leone under a USAID program to assist the reintegration of ex combatants back into their communities. Today, SMT offers group, agricultural, individual and salary loans to micro-entrepreneurs through six branches and one sub-branch in rural, urban, and peri-urban areas. By providing small loans and other financial services, SMT empowers poor clients to generate more income to help their families, improve their wellbeing, and create a more vibrant private small-business sector in Sierra Leone.

This is a Group Loan

In a group loan, each member of the group receives an individual loan but is part of a larger group of individuals. The group is there to provide support to the members and to provide a system of peer pressure, but groups may or may not be formally bound by a group guarantee. In cases where there is a group guarantee, members of the group are responsible for paying back the loans of their fellow group members in the case of delinquency or default.

Kiva's Field Partners typically feature one borrower from a group. The loan description, sector, and other attributes for a group loan profile are determined by the featured borrower's loan. The other members of the group are not required to use their loans for the same purpose.

About Sierra Leone

  • $2,100
    Average annual income
  • 53
    View loans »
    Sierra Leone Loans Fundraising
  • $9,327,250
    Funds lent in using Kiva
  • 3,820.7
    Sierra Leone Leones (SLL) = $1 USD

Success!! The loan was 100% repaid

A portion of Khulafai Primary School Group's $2,900 loan helped a member construction of a family home on already-purchased land.
100% repaid
Repayment Term
11 months (Additional Information)
Repayment Schedule
Monthly
Pre-Disbursed:
Nov 12, 2009
Listed
Nov 14, 2009
Currency Exchange Loss:
Possible
Ended:
Sep 15, 2010